11- Apr2018
Posted By: DPadmin
20 Views

5 conversion boosters to optimize your PPC campaigns 

Earlier this year, Facebook broke some bad news. Organic reach is officially being choked, making it harder for brands to reach the audiences they’ve worked so hard to build.

Because of this, I believe marketers will look to SEM (search engine marketing) to recapture lost attention. The problem is, there’s already so much competition. How do you get past the noise and generate PPC (pay per click) results, and which KPIs (key performance indicators) should you be tracking to measure success?

Optimizing conversion rate (CVR) is one of the fastest ways to improve AdWords efficiency. It allows you to test new approaches and boost ROI without having to expand target keywords, campaigns or budget.

Here are five approaches to PPC that will help you generate more conversions and better results in 2018 and beyond.

1. Optimize keyword quality score

Google’s entire business model relies on providing searchers with relevant results. This goes for organic results as well as AdWords.

To do this, Google assigns your target keywords a Quality Score (QS). This QS, along with your CPC (cost per click) bid, is what then determines your “Ad Rank.”

The three elements that determine your QS are:

  1. Ad relevance (in other words, how relevant the keyword is to the ad copy you serve).
  2. Landing page experience.
  3. Expected CTR (click-through rate).

Many PPC experts consider CTR the most important factor when determining QS. Therefore, when looking to optimize your QS, start with CTR.

Analyze the keyword relevancy of your campaigns. Is your ad copy aligned with the search intent of the keyword?

It’s good practice to create separate Ad Groups for each of your keywords. Also known as Single Keyword Ad Groups, this is where you cater to the intent of specific searchers rather than a larger group.

In the example below (courtesy of ConversionXL), ASDA is the only advertiser for the term “womens red dresses” with copy tailored to that search term.

As well as relevancy, your ad copy should quickly sell the benefits of the “click.” In other words, why should the searcher pay attention? Make your headlines relevant, focusing on the desires and pain points of your audience.

By optimizing CTR, and therefore quality score, you’ll generate more qualified traffic. And high-quality traffic delivers better conversion rates.

Once you’ve optimized CTR, your landing pages should be the next target. Dynamic text replacement (DTR) can provide some quick wins. This “swaps” specific copy in your landing page based on the keyword the user searched to find you. DTR can improve quality score and therefore contribute to a higher CVR.

2. Intelligent remarketing

When it comes to AdWords, high bounce rates are a fact of life. Users who come to your landing pages are at various stages of the customer journey. For example, a call-to-action (CTA) for a demo won’t work on a searcher who is still educating themselves on different solutions.

To capture these missed opportunities, use remarketing to cross-sell and “down-sell” bounced visitors. Let’s start by expanding on the example above. If you’re offering a demo of your software to someone who is still in the awareness phase, this approach won’t be as effective as something that answers their questions.

Therefore, an e-book that teaches prospects how to overcome specific challenges is an appropriate down-sell. It would educate them on the options available to them while providing information about how your product makes the process easier.

Of course, these challenges will vary depending on personas and customer segments. Therefore, you must personalize your ad creative where necessary.

Retargeting in this way allows you to capture lead information that would have been otherwise lost, boosting the CVR and overall ROI of your campaigns. The mistake many marketers make here is to “re-sell” the demo request. Use it as an opportunity to educate them and add more value instead of forcing them further down the funnel.

Here are some tips you can apply to your remarketing ads to capture the attention of lost leads:

  • Test different lead magnets: Different personas and customer types respond to different forms of media. Split-test your remarketing ads to offer an e-book and webinar. See which generates the highest conversions and double down on those formats.
  • Name-drop influencers: If you work with well-known influencers in your space, consider including them in your remarketing ads. This association adds an element of trust like no other.
  • Use dynamic targeting: Serve specific ads to different audience segments. More on this later.

The point of remarketing is to capture lost users and retain customers. Don’t waste the opportunity by serving the same messaging. Look for ways to add value up and down the funnel.

3. Tap into the power of machine learning

AI and machine learning bring the promise of higher-performing marketing at speed. From an AdWords perspective, this would mean automated bid and budget management, using more data than a human can handle to make adjustments in real time.

To find out exactly what impact machine learning has on PPC performance, we analyzed 32,858 paid accounts using the Acquisio Turing platform to uncover the truth. Here’s what we found out about conversions and machine learning:

  1. An average increase in conversions of 71 percent.
  2. A median increase in conversions of 22 percent.

Discussions of landing page quality aside, the huge difference between average and median is explained by the fact that a certain number of accounts saw extremely high increases in number of conversions, which skews the average in a meaningful way. If we wished to exclude those extremes from the discussion, we would look at the median score, which tells us the percent increase in conversions that was observed for the 50th percentile.

The plot thickened because this increase in conversions came with an overall decrease in cost per acquisition (CPA). In fact, the median CPA had a decrease of 18 percent, with 64 percent of the group enjoying a decrease in CPA overall.

While the report above focused on the increase in conversions made possible by machine learning, our most recent study examined 50,000 campaigns to determine Google AdWords Industry Benchmarks and looked at conversion rate (CVR) with and without machine learning by industry. Here are the CVR findings segmented by business category:

Conversion rate (CVR) by industry with and without machine learning

Machine learning martech helps PPC marketers scale and optimize marketing activities efficiently, but it’s also a serious contender for conversion boosts.

Here’s the thing: Machine learning technologies get better the more they learn. In other words, results will improve as machine learning algorithms react to new findings. Check out The Marketer’s Field Guide to Machine Learning for more information.

4. Test new ad extensions

To cut through the noise, you must capture as much SERP (search engine results page) real estate as possible. This means not only standing out with your creative but also expanding how much room your ads take up.

To do this, test different ad extensions on your top-performing campaigns. Ad extensions, as defined by Google, “expand your ad with additional information — giving people more reasons to choose your business. They typically increase an ad’s click-through rate by several percentage points.”

Ad extensions come in several forms, the most popular of which are:

  • Sitelink Extensions: Provide links to other relevant pages on your website.
  • Callout Extensions: Additional information on what you’re offering, e.g., limited stock and free delivery.
  • Structured Snippets: Allows you to highlight specific elements. For example, if you’re selling “Italian vegan leather boots,” you can include a list of shoe sizes.
  • Location Extensions: Include your business address and telephone number in your ad copy.

As you’re well aware, mobile user behavior is very different from desktop users’. Indeed, 61.9 percent of all PPC clicks were from a smartphone during Q3 of 2017.

Google has reacted to this shift in behavior by adding additional extensions for ads that appear on mobile devices. These are:

  • Message Extensions: Allow users to send an SMS to your business directly from the SERPs.
  • Call Extensions: Similarly, users can dial a phone number provided within your ad copy.

 

As always, test different extensions on a small scale before applying them to all of your campaigns. Keep the customer’s journey and intent in mind. Are they searching for a term with several possible outcomes? Consider using a Sitelink extension. Does it look like they’re searching for your retail store on a mobile phone? Include mobile extensions.

5. Advanced segmentation with in-market audiences

Facebook Ads are popular among marketers due to the advanced targeting available. But many are still unaware of AdWords’ functionality to do the same.

Google collects a tremendous amount of data on their users. So it was only a matter of time before they allowed marketers to use it themselves.

That’s where in-market audiences come in. By using in-market audiences within your display ads targeting, you can target users based on their consumer behavior, as well as the content they have expressed an interest in online.

The data available is sorted into several market categories, including real estate, travel and telecommunication. You can then set targeting on a granular level, all the way down to specific interests and brand names:

So, how does it work? According to Google, data such as sites browsed, the proximity of visits, relevant ads clicked and conversions are all taken into account to categorize users by intent.

This means that, while this is limited to the Display network only, you’re able to serve hyper-specific ads to those who have expressed an interest. From persona segments to product categories, the options are many.

Source: 5 conversion boosters to optimize your PPC campaigns – Marketing Land

11- Apr2018
Posted By: DPadmin
23 Views

Optimize for voice search by keeping it short and to the point 

Contributor Dave Davies explains the many layers and aspects of Google Voice Search and how to optimize your content for it.

OK, Google … how do I optimize for voice search?

Ask that question and you’ll discover even Google doesn’t know but is trying to learn.

For those of us in the search engine optimization (SEO) field who want to stay up to date, waiting for Google to figure it out isn’t much help. We need to know what’s going on, and we need to know it before our competitors get the jump on us.

Who uses voice search?

Before we dive into the approaches we need to take to optimize for voice search, let’s take time to gain an understanding of who is using it.

Our friends over at Stone Temple Consulting published their findings after surveying 1,000 people on their use of voice commands. Here are some highlights:

  • People are becoming more comfortable using voice search in public.
  • The 35-to-44 age group is the largest segment using voice search.
  • The 25-to-34 age group is most comfortable using voice search in public.
  • The heaviest users of voice search have an income above $50,000 per year.

Add to this the Gartner research that predicts 75 percent of US homes will have a smart speaker by 2020:

It appears we will have a deep saturation of a technology with strong buying power in the near future.

You may be thinking, “Yes, Dave, we know voice search is important, and we know who is searching using voice, but what can we do to get our content in front of it all?”

Excellent question. Let’s take a look.

Voice search ranking factor

Clearly, the environment is changing rapidly, and it is difficult to predict specifically how users will interact with their devices using voice.

The winners in the voice space will be those who pay close attention to the various devices that launch and how they are used.

Understanding the new device capabilities and who is using them is step one.

Recently, Greg Sterling covered a study done by Backlinko on voice search ranking factors.

The study is based on 10,000 Google Home search results and is close to what I’ve experimented with on my own device on a much smaller scale.

In the findings, they note some results may be due to causality, while others may be coincidence or correlation. Understanding what’s at play is crucial to understanding what Google is looking at.

There are several key takeaways from the Backlinko study I feel are important to note:

  • Answers are 29 words on average. When you’re structuring the data you want to become a voice “answer,” make sure it’s short and to the point. This means formatting the page so an answer can be easily drawn from it and understood to be a complete answer to the question.

For example, ask Google what the Pythagorean theorem is and you’ll hear this 25-word reply:

  • The average writing level of a result was targeted to the ninth-grade reading level, so keep it simple.
  • Presently, voice search results seem to serve a more generic audience. I don’t expect this to last long; ranking for the present requires writing to the masses.
  • Google may eventually cater the reading level to the individual searching and implied education level of the query.
  • The average word count of pages used to draw voice search results was 2,312 words. This suggests Google wants to draw results from authoritative pages.

With each page we create, we need to keep in mind the entity we are discussing and the intent(s) we need to satisfy when trying to optimize for voice and general search.

Entities

An entity is basically a noun connected by relationships.

If answering the question, “who is Dave Davies,” Google needs to search their database of entities for the various Dave Davieses and determine the one most likely to satisfy the searcher’s intent. They will then compare that with the other entities related to it to determine its various traits.

When someone searches for Dave Davies, Google usually assumes they are looking for Dave Davies of The Kinks and not the author of this article.

I will get to why in a minute. Let’s look briefly at how Google connects the various entities around the musician Dave Davies.

A very small connection structure to illustrate might look something like:

What we are seeing here are the entities (referenced in patents as nodes) and how they are connected.

So, for example, the entity “Dave Davies” is connected to the entity “Ray Davies” by the relationship “Has Brother.”

He would also be connected to the entity “February 3, 1947” by the relationship “Has Birthday” and the entity “Kinks” by the relationship “has Band.”

Other people in the band will also share this entity point with Dave, enabling them to all appear for a query such as:

OK Google, who was in the Kinks

to which Google will reply:

The band members of the Kinks include Ray Davies, Dave Davies, Mick Avory and others.

To illustrate further the connected understanding Google applies to entities and their importance, they allow Google to respond to multiple questions without explicit direction and to understand the weight and prominence of specific entities to determine which to rank.

For example, Dave Davies of The Kinks is a more prominent entity than Dave Davies the SEO, so if I ask “who is Dave Davies,” it will reference the Wikipedia page of the Kinks guitarist.

Understanding the entity relationships and how they’re referenced on the web helps Google determine this but it’s also the reason why we can follow up with the question, “OK Google, who is Dave Davies’ brother,” and “Ray Davies” is given as the answer.

This is what will provide us the blueprint for creating the content that will rank in voice search. Understanding how entities relate to each other and giving concise and easily digested information on as many related topics as possible will ensure that Google sees us as the authoritative answer.

And not just for the first questions but also supplemental questions, thus increasing the probability our content will satisfy the user intent.

Circling back

This explains why the Backlinko study found longer content tended to rank better. A longer piece of content (or a grouping of pages, well-connected/linked and covering the same subject) is not just more likely to answer the user intent and potential follow-up questions but also eliminates any possibility that the entity selection is incorrect.

Let’s consider my own bio here on Search Engine Land. Why does Google not accidentally select this bio when answering the query, “who is Dave Davies?”

The bio is on a strong site, is tied to entity relationships such as my position, website and Twitter profile. That is a lot of information about me, so why not select it?

Wikipedia has enough content on the Dave Davies from the Kinks page and enough supporting entity data to confirm he is the correct Dave Davies.

Intents

What we see here is that covering as many related entities and questions as possible in our content is critical to ranking well for voice search. It extends beyond voice, obviously, but due to the absence of anything other than position zero, voice is far more greatly impacted.

Earlier, I mentioned Google determines which entity the user is likely to be referencing when there are multiples to select from.

In the end, it comes down to intent, and Google determines intent based on a combination of related factors from previous queries.

If I simply ask “OK Google, who is his brother” without first asking it about Dave Davies, Google will not be able to reply. Google uses a system of metrics related to authority and relevance to determine which would win in a generic environment.

While not all patents are used, some iteration of their patent “Ranking Search Results Based On Entity Metrics” probably is. According to the patent, Google uses the following four metrics to determine which entity is strongest:

  • Relatedness. As Google sees relationships or entities appear relatedly on the web (e.g., “Dave Davies” and “Ray Davies”), they will connect these entities.
  • Notability. This relates to notability in the field. Basically, it takes into account the popularity of the entity in question and also the popularity of the field as a whole. The music industry is a bit more notable than the SEO industry, and the Kinks are listed as one of the most influential bands of all times.
  • Contribution. Google will weight entities by reviews, fame rankings and similar information. Some may suggest Dave Davies of the Kinks is a little more famous than I am.
  • Prizes. More weight will be added to an entity or aspect of that entity based on prizes and awards. This isn’t referring to a lotto but rather something like a Grammy. Had I won a Nobel Prize for SEO, I might have been selected.

There is more to determining the generic intent reply than a single patent, but this gives us a very good idea how it’s calculated.

The next step in ranking on voice search is to isolate which entities will have these metrics and cover them by writing targeted content well.

Cover the core answer, but also consider all the various entities connected to that answer to reinforce that you’re referring to the same entity and also have the authority and information to give the best answer.

Bottom line

If you want to rank in voice search, you need three things:

  • A strong domain.
  • Strong content.
  • Content divided into logical and easily digested segments.

Out of the three, I feel that easily digested content and weight are the most influential elements.

Of course, getting a site up to par with Wikipedia is a massive undertaking, but I suspect we will see this weighting drop in importance as Google gains confidence in its capabilities to actually determine quality content and context.

Source: Optimize for voice search by keeping it short and to the point – Search Engine Land

04- Apr2018
Posted By: DPadmin
22 Views

Optimizing for quality score is a best practice, except when it’s not. Here’s why.

Quality score is a complex metric because it is a basic but fundamental component of ad rank.

Optimizing for quality score is a best practice, except when it isn’t. A high quality score is a sign of account health, except when it isn’t. Like any other paid search “best practice,” it is only a best practice when it works in your favor.

Because quality score is a fundamental element of an account and has been widely written about, it is a focal point for many advertisers. While some of that is fair, some of the attention it receives is unnecessary.

More than a few people have reached out and asked how quality score can be improved in their account. My first inclination is to suggest they first ensure that a quality score improvement is going to help drive them closer to the business goals they hope to achieve.

The reality is that spending a lot of time and capital on increasing quality score doesn’t always pay off, as you will soon see.

Tie your account goals to business goals

To determine if something is “working,” you have to know whether or not it is contributing toward your goals. This is where things can get a little sticky.

Sometimes when I speak with people, increasing their quality score is their goal. If that’s the case, there may be a good reason — but I’d ask the account owner to dig into:

  1. What they ultimately hope to achieve with their AdWords account.
  2. Why it is that they want to increase quality score. Typically, the resulting answer to this question is something along the lines of “Because it’s a best practice.” Do you see where I’m going with this? I think this is the human version of Excel’s circular reference.

So let’s back up. Let’s step outside of the pay-per-click (PPC) account for a second and talk about business goals. Once those are written down, then we will write down PPC goals that support each of those.

Business goals are almost always something like: generate X number of leads at an acceptable cost, generate sales at X percent return on investment (ROI) or calculating return on ad spend (ROAS), and contribute to $X in revenue.

Quality score could possibly support one of the PPC goals, but there’s almost never a situation where it is a goal on its own because there is almost never a situation where it is a direct link to a corporate goal. I know. I said it. And I mean it! (Honestly, I can’t think of a single one.)

What you can learn from quality score

There are a lot of great insights that can be learned from quality score, most obviously:

  • Relevance.
  • Landing page experience.
  • Expected click-through rate.

Each item listed is important, even at the surface level, but, there’s more than meets the eye with these metrics. If your quality score is suffering due to relevance and your click-through rate still seems to suffer, there could be a deeper issue at play.

For example, it could be that the keywords you’ve chosen are too broad or don’t show enough intent and are being matched with queries that aren’t really the best fit.

This is pretty easy to dig into: Just look into the search terms report and make sure the terms are a good fit for your products and services. If there are just a few misses, it could be solved with negatives, but if the problem is widespread, you may want to rethink your keyword strategy.

When quality score matters

Quality score is an important metric, and it should still be evaluated as a potential optimization opportunity. For example, if one of your highest conversion-generating keywords has a low quality score, it would be reasonable to assume improving the quality score could improve the average cost per acquisition (CPA) on a high volume of conversions. That would be well worth your while!

On the opposite end of the spectrum, you might find quality score so low it is impossible for a keyword to get any traction. It can be worthwhile to focus efforts on those terms, which could result in expanded reach.

In addition, if you find there seems to be a quality score issue at scale (click-through rate, for instance), that might indicate an area of opportunity that could have a wide-reaching positive impact without a high level of effort.

There are times quality score optimizations can have a real, substantial impact, it just isn’t safe to assume that is always the case.

When quality score can be detrimental

The goal of quality score is to ensure each searcher is met with advertisers that will provide the best experience both in terms of relevance to the needs they’ve identified and in terms of user experience (UX).

Quality score is pretty well refined, too. The search engines have spent a lot of time improving quality score, the supporting factors and providing insight into areas in which advertisers can improve.

However, that said, it isn’t perfect. Although the cues quality score looks for are good indicators, there are times they can be counterintuitive. While you may be marching toward an increase in quality score, you could be marching away from more important performance metrics.

There are a few ways this can happen, even with the best of intentions. Here’s one: Ads with dynamic keyword insertion (DKI) often show increases in click-through rate over those ads that don’t have DKI, but that doesn’t always mean the ad is better quality.

Although the click-through rate (CTR) may increase, conversions may not. At that point, if you were basing your performance purely on CTR and quality score, it would be considered a win. However, if you were basing your results on performance against business goals, an increased cost per lead with no increase in conversions wouldn’t be considered a win.

This is just one example of many where making an increase in quality score your primary goal can come to the detriment of more important performance indicators.

Should that scare you away from making quality score optimizations when needed? No! It should only serve to illustrate why quality score shouldn’t be the primary account goal.

When optimizing for quality score isn’t the best use of time

There are times quality score optimizations just aren’t likely to have a worthwhile impact on your keyword’s performance. For example, if your keyword meets any of the following criteria, quality score optimizations aren’t likely to have a big impact:

  • If the keyword is low-volume for any reason aside from quality score.
  • If the keyword is already getting a decent amount of traffic that doesn’t convert well. There may be other optimizations that could help solve this, but quality score isn’t likely the best starting point.
  • The keyword already has a relatively high quality score, even if not a full 10.

To optimize or not to optimize

The goal of this post wasn’t to suggest no one should ever optimize for quality score — in fact, you should! But, at some point, you will likely have to prioritize some account optimization efforts over others, and your quality score optimizations should be prioritized based on their likelihood to impact your account and business goals.

As we’ve seen from my examples above, there are times optimizing for quality score can come at the expense of other key performance indicators, which becomes an unjustifiable risk.

The most important thing is to always benchmark your performance against relevance, landing page experience and expected click-through rate as they apply to your business. Any optimization made to improve quality score should do just that, but without taking away from your primary goal.

Source: Optimizing for quality score is a best practice, except when it’s not. Here’s why. – Search Engine Land

01- Mar2018
Posted By: DPadmin
31 Views

8 Things You Can Do to Significantly Improve Your SEO

What do you think of when you hear the term SEO? Many people think of keywords and focus a large part of their time trying to perfect the keywords they choose. If you’ve been focusing on keyword optimization and the results you want aren’t there, you should turn to some other things to significantly improve your SEO.

A good thing to keep in mind is that search engine algorithms rate the relevance of keywords on pages and in the meta data, but also evaluate other information like the time visitors spend on your site, the presence of broken links, the inbound and outbound links, bounce rate, the pages viewed and more.

To improve your website’s ranking, you need to get users to stay on your site and interact with your content. Do this by improving the usability and user experience on your website.

Take a look at these eight things you can do to significantly improve your SEO.

1. Provide high quality, useful content

The amount of time visitors spend on your website can affect your SEO ranking. Visitors tend to stay on your website for longer amount of time (also called dwell time) when you provide useful content. Research shows that content around 2,000 to 2,500 words ranks the highest in search engine results.

The word count of your content isn’t the only thing that impacts the SEO world–no one will read what you share if it doesn’t help them–but longer content does give you the ability to provide greater value, include more keywords, add outbound links, and get people to stay on your page and spend more time reading. High quality content is one of the most impactful SEO best practices to generate sales and generate business growth.

2. Improve load speed

Users might leave your website if the pages don’t load immediately–even waiting five seconds for a page to load hurts your dwell time. Pages that don’t open quickly increase your bounce rate, reducing the number of pages people view. Both of these things hurt your SEO ranking.

Some steps you can take to speed up your page load, from using caching plug-ins to making sure the code is streamlined and clean, will help your page load more quickly. Remember to minimize redirects and ensure all images are properly optimized to reduce file size, improving the speed of load. This is essential to business success whether you offer private jet rental services worldwide or have a small e-commerce clothing shop.

Make sure you use good, high quality images: according to research, quality images often increase conversion rates. Make sure to optimize images to generate empathy, improve trust, and create a better experience for the visitor.

Bing and Google both take page-loading speed into consideration when ranking websites.

3. Optimize your images

In addition to image sizing and file format, you can take other steps to ensure the images you use are on your side when it comes to SEO. When you do this, you’ll show that your content is relevant to search engines. Use keywords for the image file name, description, alt tag, title, and caption. This is just one of many ways you can make your e-commerce store a success.

4. Header tags

People don’t want to read a big block of text. Instead, format your content in a way that makes the user experience enjoyable. Readers will want to spend time reading content and come back again and again for more. This will signal your site’s relevance to search engines.

The proper use of header tags will break up the content you’re sharing into sections that make it easier to read your information. No one will bother reading what you wrote if you make it hard for them.

Keywords in header tags are a must; search engines rate them more heavily. Include relevant terms in your readers’ tags to improve your SEO ranking.

5. Include outbound links

You’ll make your content more relevant when you link to well-known sites that can provide readers with in-depth, helpful information they will want to read. When you link to authority websites, you increase the relevance of the content you write and the time readers spend on your website. This can also send positive signals about your site to the search engines.

6. Utilize various forms of multimedia

Do what you can to enrich your users’ experience and use various forms of multimedia. Images, slideshows, videos, and audio each allow you to deliver helpful information to your viewers in a way that suits them.

A variety of forms of multimedia also signal search engines that your site provides quality content, and it’s true: you have to put time and effort into your site to produce that interactive content.

One reason businesses are turning to video marketing is due to its high efficacy. It’s a crucial part of driving user engagement, generating more conversions. Utilizing video marketing leads to a 4.8 percent higher rate of conversion than 2.9 percent of websites that fail to utilize videos. Videos encourage visitors to spend more time on a site and allow them to retain more information too.

7. Remove any broken links

Does anyone like to get a 404 page when they’re hoping to read helpful information? Broken links negatively impact usability, and search engines see numerous broken links as a sign of a neglected site, negatively impacting SEO ranking.

The good news is that you don’t have to go through every page of your website to manually test the links. You can utilize apps and tools to help check for broken links, if you prefer.

8. Readability

It doesn’t matter how well-versed your audience is, no one wants to have to decipher the content on your website. The last thing you want is for your readers to give up and click away from your site because the content you wrote is too tough to digest.

Write in a way that is conversational so it’s useful to your readers. Experts believe Google takes readability into account as it ranks websites.

There are various tactics you can use to bump up your ranking in the search engines. Keep your focus on the tactics you can use to build a website that gives users an optimal experience, and you’ll find a boost in conversions and customer retention.

Read more at https://www.business2community.com/seo/8-things-can-significantly-improve-seo-01972054

Source: 8 Things You Can Do to Significantly Improve Your SEO

26- Sep2017
Posted By: DPadmin
360 Views

11 Strategies for Optimizing Your Amazon Product Listing

You just need to keep focused and follow some consistent strategies.

Amazon is the biggest online marketplace that can help many retailers sell their products online. However, ranking high on Amazon requires a better understanding of the Amazon product ranking algorithm, A9.

To boost your product’s visibility on Amazon here are 11 tactics that can surely raise your conversions and will help to improve your ROI.

1. Make products available for Amazon Prime.

Amazon’s revenue from prime members extends well beyond subscription fees. Recently, it was estimated that Amazon brought in about 90 percent of revenue from prime subscriptions.

Why select a product that ships at a low speed with an additional cost when you could purchase a product with fast and free shipping?

To give a lift-off to your product’s visibility, you need to make it eligible for Amazon Prime. If you are unable to ship from a warehouse, you can make your items fulfilled by Amazon Fulfillment (FBA). This means that you ship your products to Amazon’s warehouses and they will take care of shipping, handling, and returns.

But unfortunately, FBA fees are generally not expedient for sellers. You can use their FBA calculator in order to calculate the accurate fees and determine if this process is for you.

Use a warehouse (or garage) of your own, as seller fulfilled prime area. This course of action has been introduced by Amazon which allows merchants to ship from their warehouses directly. This saves the fees and cuts the cost to you of FBA fees. You can find out more about the program on Amazon’s YouTube Channel.

2. Optimize product title.

Noticeably, your product title will have the greatest influence on product performance in search. According to Amazon, your title should include components such as:

  • Brand
  • Product type
  • Product line
  • Size
  • Color
  • Quantity
  • Material or key feature

Your product title might look like this:

Brand Name + Series Name + Model Name + Form Factor + Unique Identifier (color, capacity, pack size, etc).

An example of good product title optimization.

Look below at some of the useful ways to optimize Amazon product titles.

  • Use special characters like & – etc. to add some style and break up phrases naturally.
  • Make the length around 80 characters of your product title.
  • Product titles should be filled with the product information and its distinguishing features rather than with rebate offers, keywords, claims, sales messaging or anything else. An example of a perfectly executed product title is KIND granola that offers useful information relevantly with proper naming convention.

This is an example of a clear and an informative title that is listed favorably by Amazon and clicked-on without hesitation by potential customers.

3. Optimize product description.

Get HTML text formatting and images into your brand registered products description with Amazon’s enhanced brand content.

The advantage of enhanced brand content is that you can spark your listing page with more graphics and visuals. Thus it will become easy for potential customer to read through and it also enables you to break up your product page into logical sections with headers.

You should also get some more visuals, photography and infographics prepared for EBC content instead of using same images in the image carousel on your listing because all EBC content is checked by people at Amazon.
If your brand is registered then you would create your enhanced brand content into your seller central account as:

An example demonstrating how to create your enhanced brand content into your seller central account.

Look at some of the below mentioned ways that can help you in optimizing your product description.

  • Use capital letters to spotlight features.
  • Add powerful taglines to split the description to make it easily readable.
  • Explain why consumer is going to love your product by giving your product a narrative.
  • Use explanatory language (e.g. vigorous, effective, strong, beautiful and smooth).

4. Optimize for Amazon SEO.

The first step is to understand Amazon’s search algorithm (A9) to rank your product at the top of SERPs. Amazon sorts results by relevance and performance factors.

Use Amazon keyword research tool like Sonar to make suggestions according to search queries of Amazon shoppers, research keywords relatively and know the actual search volume of keywords on Amazon.

  • Include relevant keywords and use long tail keywords in your listing text.
  • Create your bullet points between two-three lines each. Use HTML and formatting to make them visually more attractive.
  • Use Sellics keyword ranking tracker to see the daily changes in keyword rankings, adjust the date range to analyze a specific time period and make notes in the keyword tracker. Sellics also optimize your sponsored products ads and increase your organic sales on Amazon advertisement.
  • Use product photos with resolution of at least 1,000 x 1,000 pixels to enable zoom function, ensure the clear visibility of your brand in at least one of your product images and use few photos to demonstrate benefits or uses.

5. Select right category for your product.

Your product category need to be correct for your listing to be visible on Amazon. While editing your listing in more details find item type to categorize your product.

Shoppers frequently browse by category. The simplest method to determine what category to select is to look at some batch of competitors and categorize accordingly. List your product by considering the following situation.

  • If competitors are all in the same category and have high revenues, use that same category.
  • If competitors are all in the same category and have bad revenues, what will you differently?
  • If competitors are in various categories, examine their monthly revenues to find a connection among category and listing.
  • If category does not affect revenue, select the category that is more relevant for your product.
  • If revenue is affected by category then select the category having high revenue.

6. Make use of PPC keywords.

You should run Amazon pay-per-click ads. PPC has a positive approach towards listing optimization.

Look at your product ads and figure out your keywords having an ACoS below 25 percent. List them into your product’s description, headline and backend keywords for proper integration.

For example: A customer who sold silicone baking mats. After running Amazon PPC the keyword “silicone baking pan” earned $4 for every $1 spent. It wasn’t instinctive as that was a different product than a baking mat, but it turned out that people who were searching for pans bought mats.

They took this new keyword and put it into a bullet point. We can often call it reusability of a “silicone baking pan.” They generated some extra revenue. You will get the better listing with running more ads automatically.

7. List an ASIN in your product field.

This will surely generate traffic to your page. Just get your product listed on a product page that is ranking. This is a great option for those who can compete for cost with nearly identical product. You can simply search the ASIN in the URL.
For example: Amazon.com/gp/product/B011ZLWHOE.

B011ZLWHOE is the ASIN in the above mentioned URL. Add that ASIN to your product fields, change the brand in your product fields to the brand on the listing. Ensure that you have a lower price as compared to your competitor’s product.

 

8.  Avoid duplicate content.

Ensure that all your product pages on Amazon must use content that are different from e-commerce website you are using. As they are two different search engines. This is very obvious mistake that businesses make by using the same content.

You can make an original content in the following ways.

  • Read the product description carefully.
  • Write new description for your products covering all the important points and ensuring not to use the same sentences.
  • Offer extra important information that has not been covered previously.

9. Use product listing grader.

Improve your listing by using a free tool like The Jungle Scout Product Listing Grader.
This tool will provide you a rating and a breakdown of every element on the page performs:

(An example, demonstrating the breakdown of each element giving you a rate of your product performance).

You can calculate this by including points to each and every element.

(An image to depict where to spend the most time optimizing).

The more you work towards increasing the points the better rank you will get on Amazon.

10. Product rating.

The reviews you do get plays an important role because these will stimulate your rating.
Your product is doing actually well if you are in the top four-five star realm. But if your product is competing with a lower rating then no need to worry. Fortunately, take the following actions to get rid of struggling with product rating.

  • Search out the reasons in the bad reviews and try to fix the wrong things with the product.
  • Collect feedback from consumers with automated email campaigns to rectify a problem so as to avoid negative review.
  • Gather more reviews and manage your overall rating with good reviews.

Ensure to provide a stunning product at a reasonable price and offer a great customer experience.

11. Split testing your way to the top.

Split testing is probably the most verifiable correct way to know what works and what doesn’t. This includes changing one element of your listing and serving both this and the original to customers of your product page.

Collect significant data by running a split tests in order to get flexible ways so as to improve your listing.

Running a split tests on an Amazon product listing will alter your price by increasing or decreasing 10 percent and test your main image.
Amazon’s only split testing tool, Splitly helps sellers to know where they can optimize their products by creating various experiments.

(An example where sellers get more than double their average daily sales).

The above test results clearly describes that the product listing change that was decreased in price of three dollars, has greatly improved conversion rate and average daily sales.

Amazon can be a very challenging and tough marketplace.

Though Amazon is tough, if you spend some extra effort and time in learning how to optimize your listings then it will be much easier for you to compete.

Simply, follow the above mentioned strategies and go get selling by focusing on the things that matters to be ahead of many competitors.

Source: 11 Strategies for Optimizing Your Amazon Product Listing

10- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
159 Views

This script automates adding any AdWords data to a Google spreadsheet

If you’ve ever been frustrated at the amount of time you spend creating PPC reports, you’re not alone. Today, I’ll do my best to help you with a new AdWords script I just finished.

The severity of the reporting problem became very clear to me at a conference I recently attended. Attendees were asked to leave sticky notes describing the most timing-consuming aspects of their jobs. I know it’s not exactly a scientific study, but I found the results fascinating anyway. Here’s what the board looked like:

The orange arrows highlight each note that said “reporting” was the most time-consuming PPC task.

Meetings are another time-consuming task people added to the board several times — but I’m not going to help you fix that with a script, so let me focus on reporting, a topic I’ve covered several times in recent posts here.

When it comes to reporting, you should really try to produce something that gives the stakeholder the data and insights they need, but in such a way that you can easily repeat, and hopefully even automate it. There are plenty of tools that can help with that.

And while automating reports is a reasonable goal, the reality is that there will always be cases where the client wants just one extra piece of data. And because of Murphy’s Law, this will always the one thing your reporting tool doesn’t cover.

Why don’t reporting tools cover everything? By my last count, AdWords has 46 different types of reports available through their API, ranging from common ones like an account performance report to the more obscure, like the keywordless category report:

Reports available through the AdWords API. Screen shot from the Google Developers Site

In all likelihood, the vast majority of people care about just 10 percent of these reports, so engineering resources get assigned to supporting the most commonly requested reports. And even if a tool covers all 46 possible report types, it might not filter the data the way the client wants, or include some of the lesser used metrics, attributes or segments.

So, how do we get custom data from AdWords into virtually any reporting engine? Through a data connector. And one of the most popular places for marketers to store data is in a spreadsheet.

Google Sheets, just like AdWords, can be automated with App Scripts from Google. This means we can write some code to make the spreadsheet connect with a data source of our choosing. Combined with AdWords scripts, which have permission to access your AdWords data, we can create an automation that lets you specify a template for a report, and then automatically add the requested data on a predetermined schedule.

So, here we go! Let’s get you a free tool to put any AdWords data you want into a Google Spreadsheet.

Step 1: Set up the report template in Google Sheets

Copy this spreadsheet into your own Google Drive. This sheet will look very boring when you first load it, but there are about 600 lines of code in the “Script Editor” section where all the magic happens. This will also be moved to your Google Drive when you copy the script into your own account.

Notice that when the spreadsheet finishes loading, you’ll have a custom menu called “AdWords Data Grabber from Optmyzr.”

Select the type of report you’d like to run from this custom menu:

When you select a report type, the spreadsheet connects with AdWords to get the appropriate attributes, metrics and segments for the selected report. It automatically sets up drop-downs in the spreadsheet to let you choose which elements to include in the report and what filters to apply.

Go to the “Settings” tab and choose a date range for your report from the drop-down. Since the goal is to set this report on an automated schedule, the only options are relative date ranges.

Next, select any filters you want to apply to the data. A pretty common one would be to filter for items that have more than 0 impressions. This step is optional.

For things where AdWords expects you to choose from a set list of values, the spreadsheet will present you with a drop-down of valid choices, for example, for campaign status, you could choose “ENABLED.”

Now, go to the “Report” tab and select the data you want to include in each column. Once again, the spreadsheet will already be loaded with the available options for the report type you have selected.

Step 2: Install the AdWords script

Now to automate the data pulls, simply install the following AdWords script code into your account and set it on a reasonable schedule, like weekly or monthly.

/*
// AdWords Script: Put Data From AdWords Report In Google Sheets
// ————————————————————–
// Copyright 2017 Optmyzr Inc., All Rights Reserved
//
// This script takes a Google spreadsheet as input. Based on the column headers, data filters, and date range specified
// on this sheet, it will generate different reports.
//
// The goal is to let users create custom automatic reports with AdWords data that they can then include in an automated reporting
// tool like the one offered by Optmyzr.
//
//
// For more PPC management tools, visit www.optmyzr.com
//
*/
var DEBUG = 0; // set to 1 to get more details about what the script does while it runs; default = 0
var REPORT_SHEET_NAME = report; // the name of the tab where the report data should go
var SETTINGS_SHEET_NAME = settings; // the name of the tab where the filters and date range are specified
var SPREADSHEET_URL = https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1dttJTb547L81XYKdTQ56LcfO9hHhbb9wm06ZY5mKhEo/edit#gid=0; // The URL to the Google spreadsheet with your report template
var EMAIL_ADDRESSES = example@example.com; // Get notified by email at this address when a new report is ready
function main() {
var currentSetting = new Object();
currentSetting.ss = SPREADSHEET_URL;
// Read Settings Sheet
var settingsSheet = SpreadsheetApp.openByUrl(currentSetting.ss).getSheetByName(SETTINGS_SHEET_NAME);
var rows = settingsSheet.getDataRange();
var numRows = rows.getNumRows();
var numCols = rows.getNumColumns();
var values = rows.getValues();
var numSettingsRows = numRows 1;
var sortString = ;
var filters = new Array();
for(var i = 0; i < numRows; i++) {
var row = values[i];
var settingName = row[0];
var settingOperator = row[1];
var settingValue = row[2];
var dataType = row[3];
debug(settingName + + settingOperator + + settingValue);
if(settingName.toLowerCase().indexOf(report type) != 1) {
var reportType = settingValue;
} else if(settingName.toLowerCase().indexOf(date range) != 1) {
var dateRange = settingValue;
} else if(settingName.toLowerCase().indexOf(sort order) != 1) {
var sortDirection = dataType || DESC;
if(settingValue) var sortString = ORDER BY + settingValue + + sortDirection;
var sortColumnIndex = 1;
}else {
if(settingOperator && settingValue) {
if(dataType.toLowerCase().indexOf(long) != 1 || dataType.toLowerCase().indexOf(double) != 1 || dataType.toLowerCase().indexOf(money) != 1 || dataType.toLowerCase().indexOf(integer) != 1) {
var filter = settingName + + settingOperator + + settingValue;
} else {
if(settingValue.indexOf() != 1) {
var filter = settingName + + settingOperator + + settingValue + ;
} else if(settingValue.indexOf() != 1) {
var filter = settingName + + settingOperator + + settingValue + ;
} else {
var filter = settingName + + settingOperator + + settingValue + ;
}
}
debug(filter: + filter)
filters.push(filter);
}
}
}
// Process the report sheet and fill in the data
var reportSheet = SpreadsheetApp.openByUrl(currentSetting.ss).getSheetByName(REPORT_SHEET_NAME);
var rows = reportSheet.getDataRange();
var numRows = rows.getNumRows();
var numCols = rows.getNumColumns();
var values = rows.getValues();
var numSettingsRows = numRows 1;
// Read Header Row and match names to settings
var headerNames = new Array();
var row = values[0];
for(var i = 0; i < numCols; i++) {
var value = row[i];
headerNames.push(value);
//debug(value);
}
if(reportType.toLowerCase().indexOf(performance) != 1) {
var dateString = DURING + dateRange;
} else {
var dateString = ;
}
if(filters.length) {
var query = SELECT + headerNames.join(,) + FROM + reportType + WHERE + filters.join( AND ) + dateString + + sortString;
} else {
var query = SELECT + headerNames.join(,) + FROM + reportType + dateString + + sortString;
}
debug(query);
var report = AdWordsApp.report(query);
try {
report.exportToSheet(reportSheet);
var subject = Your + reportType + for + dateRange + for + AdWordsApp.currentAccount().getName() + is ready;
var body = currentSetting.ss<br>You can now add this data to <a href=’https://www.optmyzr.com’>Optmyzr</a> or another reporting system.;
MailApp.sendEmail(EMAIL_ADDRESSES, subject, body);
Logger.log(Your report is ready at + currentSetting.ss);
Logger.log(You can include this in your scheduled Optmyzr reports or another reporting tool.);
} catch (e) {
debug(error: + e);
}
}
function debug(text) {
if(DEBUG) Logger.log(text);
}

In this code, edit lines 17 through 22 with your preferences. The most critical field to update is the one with the URL of the Google spreadsheet we created and modified above.

Now you can preview the script; if your settings are fine, you should see a success message similar to this one:

Your spreadsheet should then contain the requested data and could look something like this:

Note: There are many metrics that cannot be combined in reports, for example, conversion type name cannot be reported at the same type as clicks in the campaign report. Checking for this before attempting to populate the report is tricky, so the script will return an error about your error.

When this happens, simply update the headers in the “Report” tab of the spreadsheet and run the script again until all errors are cleared.

Including the data in a report

You can use the data as-is in Google Sheets, but you can also include it in automatic scheduled reports. In Optmyzr, you would add a reporting widget that points to the URL of the spreadsheet. The tool then pulls in that data and includes it in the report, using the same styling as the native Optmyzr widgets. Your client won’t be able to tell the difference, and you’ll look like a hero for delivering the custom data they want on an automatic schedule.

Conclusion

PPC reporting takes a ton of time. And because clients invariably have some custom requests for their reports, reporting tools often need some custom integrations to deliver the goods. This AdWords script, together with the Google Apps Script in the spreadsheet, lets you bring custom data from AdWords directly into most reporting engines where you can now automate one more thing.

I hope this script helps you get back a little bit of time to do other things. And if you’re anything like the people who left the sticky notes on the board, I hope you’ll enjoy that next meeting!

Source: This script automates adding any AdWords data to a Google spreadsheet

29- Jun2017
Posted By: DPadmin
133 Views

Going Local for 2017: Local Search Engine Marketing Strategy

If you know anything about SEO marketing strategies, then you probably know that they’re incredibly fickle. Just as soon as one “best practices” article appears online telling you how to make the most of the latest update, there’s another algorithm ready to go in and mess everything up again.

There are many different strands of SEO to consider, and one that’s often under-estimated is local SEO. As the name might suggest, local SEO is all about appealing to customers in your general area. Perfect for small businesses and brick-and-mortar companies with an online presence, local SEO helps you pinpoint your customers when they need you most – for instance, when they’re searching for somewhere to go for dinner, or a nearby place to buy shoes. After all:

Across the globe, local competition in the digital sphere is heating up, and it’s crucial for businesses to learn how they can improve their search efforts if they want to get ahead of the game this year. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to do this, from refining your content, to taking social media measures. In this article, we’ll be looking at some of the most-up-to-date, and timeless tips you can follow to enhance your Local SEO marketing strategy.

Tip 1: Your Title and Meta Description Tags are Still Important

Meta description and title tags are elements of HTML that can be customized to outline the content of a webpage. In other words, it’s like a mini-advertisement, a taster of what your consumer can expect when they click onto your page.

Not so long ago, Google increased the width of the primary search engine results area, which meant that description and title tags were able to get a little bit longer. However, keeping things short and simple is often the best way to go.

image: http://cdn2.business2community.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/pasted-image-0-8-600×294.png

Take advantage of the space that you have, but use it wisely. Make sure that you double-check to ensure that you’re hitting keywords, and that your titles aren’t getting cut off in the search results. If you’re not sure how your tags are going to look in action, you can use emulators like the Yoast SEO Plugin for extra help.

Tip 2: Use the Local Schema Markup

Local schema markups are basically structured pieces of data that inform search engines of what your business does, and where it does it. These markups are only used by around 31.3% of websites, but when accessed in your marketing strategy, they can be a great way to make your business stand out, and even ensure that you rank higher than your competitors.

Google wants you to make the most of schema markups because it helps their bots to crawl through your website and find out what you’re all about. That’s why they’ve introduced their very own “Structured Data Testing Tool” which will help you to pinpoint errors in your data.

image: http://cdn.business2community.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/pasted-image-0-1-1.png

Correctly using a schema markup can raise your local ranking by several positions -yet most businesses still don’t do it. That’s great news for you – since you can take advantage of the benefits other companies in your niche are missing out on.

Tip 3: Optimize “Google my Business”

Google estimates that around 4 in 5 consumers use search engines to conduct their local searches. However, despite this, many small businesses have never claimed a single listing online – which means they’re missing out on some serious opportunities for growth.

One of the most important listings you can organize today is your “Google my Business.” This listing influences search engine users, and some studies show that users who view a complete listing are 30% more likely to visit a store.

If you’re looking for SEO rankings, then it’s worth knowing that Google likes to keep things in-house. In other words, it prefers its own business listings when giving local results to users. Additionally, if you want to make sure that you show up for the most relevant search results in your niche, then you’ll need to optimize your listing, hopefully with a lot of great reviews.

image: http://cdn2.business2community.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/pasted-image-0-2-1.png

Source

 

Webcast, July 6th: Advanced SEO Site Auditing

Tip 4: Publish Plenty of Locally Optimized Content

When you need information, where do you go?

Once upon a time, the answer might have been “a phonebook”, or “a library”, but today, nine times out of ten, you’ll get your information from the internet. Businesses can boost their presence online by providing content that’s connected not only to their business and niche, but their local area too. For instance, it’s the difference between writing a blog called “How to Find Great Shoes”, and “How to Find Great Shoes in New York”.

Since search engines prefer fresh content, it’s a good idea to use your blog to post plenty of copy answering questions that people might have in your industry. Make sure to include your keywords in the title, tags, and headlines consistently, and organically. At the same time, you can expand your content marketing strategy efforts by sharing locally-optimized pieces on social media too.

image: http://cdn.business2community.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/pasted-image-0-3-1-600×398.png

Source

Tip 5: Build an Appropriate Link Strategy

Links that span outwards from your company’s website to other websites, and vice versa, are essential to your business marketing strategy. These links help to indicate the authority and credibility of your business to Google, so that it knows where it should rank you. Links are great, but if you try to game the system and fill your pages full of them, you’re just going to end up damaging your reputation in the long-run.

Instead, you need to focus on building strong, reputable links with local companies, brands, and communities. For instance:

  • You could share links on social media to stories from local publications that are relevant to your industry
  • Include links to your website in your email newsletters, and the updates you post for customers
  • Sponsor or host local events that allow you to link out to neighborhood businesses, or ask for guest-spots posting on their blogs

Perhaps the most important part of building an authentic link strategy is to make sure it’s authentic. Ensure you know exactly who you’re linking to, and that the people you connect with are relevant to your business. Also, make sure that you don’t venture out to third-party content providers who claim they can fill your content full of SEO-boosting links. Trust me when I say this could have a disastrous impact on your reputation.

image: http://cdn2.business2community.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/pasted-image-0-4-1-600×343.png

Source

Tip 6: Post more Customer Reviews Where They Matter Most

According to recent surveys, around 84% of people trust online reviews just as much as a personal recommendation. In other words, if someone isn’t sure whether they should buy your product, they’ll go elsewhere for advice on what to do.

Google has put a great deal of emphasis on customer reviews lately, showing snippets on the search engine results page with bright golden stars designed to draw attention to your business. Getting those reviews to show up in relation to your business is one of the best ways you can boost your business trust levels, and enhance click-through rates.

The best way to increase your chances of getting great reviews for your company is to offer incredible products or services, and simply ask your customers for what you need. Some people will be so impressed by your product that they’ll be happy to write a testimonial for you without any prompting, whereas others might need the promise of a future discount to get their fingers twitching.

Either way, by adding positive customer reviews to your local SEO marketing strategy, you’re giving people close to your business the information they need, when they need it most. If someone passes your store and wonders whether you’re trustworthy, or worth their money, then all they need to do is look at those golden stars.

Building Local SEO

Obviously, building your local presence is only one aspect of a killer marketing campaign, but it’s one of the best ways to combine your offline and online advertising efforts for more traffic and more customers. If you can give your customers the information they need to find your store, and then offer an incredible experience that links back to your brand, you’ll be on your way to a profit-generating reputation in no time.

Source: Going Local for 2017: Local Search Engine Marketing Strategy

28- Jun2017
Posted By: DPadmin
215 Views

10 Pinterest SEO Tips That Will Set You up for Success 

10 Pinterest SEO Tips That Will Set You up for Success

10 Pinterest SEO Tips That Will Set You up for Success

Pinterest has slowly developed into a profitable social media channel for savvy marketers. It boasts an engaged base of more than 150 million monthly usersand provides a refreshing alternative to Google, Facebook, and Amazon.

However, it still represents something of an untapped opportunity for many of us in the SEO industry. As a social media platform, Pinterest seems to sit apart from our Google-focused efforts.

We should embrace this difference. Pinterest provides ample room for creativity and storytelling, while it also prides itself on being a “discovery” platform where Pinners can find new ideas. These are terms that should be familiar to the multi-skilled modern SEO professional.

Pinterest also offers a lot of value as an alternative search marketing channel. Did you know:

All of this is underpinned by a search engine. It differs from Google or Bing, but many of our time-honored tactics still hold true. Where there is a search engine, there will be an opportunity for optimization.

The ranking factors on Pinterest relate more to engagement metrics and social shares than backlinks and technical SEO, but these are natural byproducts of great content. Again, we in the SEO industry should know all about that.

There are some important distinctions on Pinterest too, as we would expect. Without understanding the way search results are ranked and what exactly constitutes “great content,” you will struggle to succeed in Pinterest SEO.

With that in mind, below are 10 tips to set your Pinterest profile up for SEO success.

1. Get the Basics Right

Before we get into the more exciting aspects of Pinterest, some housekeeping. You’ll need to ensure the following aspects are in place before you can start posting:

  • Create a business account(You can simply convert your personal account if that makes the most sense.) This will give you access to analytics and the Pinterest ads manager.

Pinterest Business

  • Choose an SEO friendly username. Your username will be included in your profile’s URL, so it’s worth considering what your consumers might be searching for.
  • Optimize your profile. Fill in the “about you” section with relevant details and include a high-resolution company logo. This will make it easier for people to locate and save your Pins.
  • Set up at least one board. We will go through this in more detail later, but to get started you will need at least one board. You can’t add Pins without having a board, so it’s a pretty important first step.

2. Prepare Your Website

As with most other social media platforms, you can take data from your website to feed more targeted Pinterest campaigns. You can also send people through to your website to make a transaction, so it’s essential to link these two assets together.

This requires a few simple but fundamental steps. Get all of these in place if you want to report accurately on your Pinterest SEO efforts.

  • Add the Pinterest tag. The Pinterest tag is a fundamental part of setting up an organic or paid campaign. Essentially Pinterest’s equivalent of the Facebook pixel, this small piece of JavaScript will allow you to set up conversion events on your website, segment your audience, and report reliably on your profile’s performance. A full guide can be found here and your Pinterest or agency team will be able to help you implement it.
  • Add the Save button. This one requires just a short piece of HTML code and will allow you to increase the reach of your campaigns beyond Pinterest. Once installed, users can save images on your site or app to their boards. There are two options: The button can appear automatically or when users hover over the top-left section of an image. Choose wisely. There is also a Pinterest Chrome extension that will allow visitors on your site to convert your images into Pins.

Pinterest Save Button

  • Verify your site: A few easy steps will verify your website, which will add your profile picture to all of your Pins. Again, this only requires the addition of a few lines of HTML code.

3. Set Appropriate Goals for Your Business

Lead times on Pinterest can be much longer than you’re used to on Google or even Facebook.

The image below, taken from a Pinterest study, demonstrates just how valuable this social network can be as a lead generation tool, however.

Pinterest Shopping: 87% of Pinners purchased something because of Pinterest, 93% of people say they use Pinterest to plan purchases

Therefore, although it entails a different type of user engagement, Pinterest also fills a gap in the purchase journey.

The most important element of this planning is to understand what Pinterest means for your business and set appropriate goals. You will get a sense of this from looking at your historical data, so use this to formulate a plan you can stick to. From here, you can decide which aspects are most suitably covered by organic search efforts.

You can use the Pinterest tag to set up a wide variety of conversion events on your site, too. I would advise starting with metrics like traffic and re-Pins within a Pinterest SEO campaign, before layering conversion goals on top of this activity.

Wait to start pushing overtly commercial messages until you’ve earned the trust of both Pinterest and your audience.

4. Do Your (Keyword) Research

Albeit through a slightly different lens, there is still a lot of validity in carrying out keyword research on Pinterest. In fact, as Google continues to aggregate and obscure keyword-level search volumes, there’s an argument that we should use Pinterest as a data source for all keyword research tasks. It provides a broader view of semantically related concepts and is driven by a deep understanding of how visual our culture is in the 21st century.

The following tips should help you discover the right topics for your Pins and boards:

  • Use guided search. Guided search on Pinterest helps users narrow their focus and find more relevant results. Using the initial search query as a stimulus, Pinterest automatically suggests semantically related modifiers. These are a pretty good indicator of the most popular search queries for each topic.  You can then copy and paste these suggestions into another document.

Pinterest Blazers

  • Engage with Promoted Pins. The logic here is similar (identical, in fact) to that which leads us to use AdWords to trial specific keywords to see how they perform before launching a long-term SEO campaign. If you have any hesitations about the right topics to target, you can take your best-performing keywords on Google and use Promoted Pins to see if they follow suit on Pinterest.
  • Explore topics. Pinterest does a lot of the legwork for us here, with topics already neatly categorized and sub-categorized in most areas. You should explore all topics relevant to your business to see how ideas are categorized, but also to see how your competitors are targeting specific queries.

Pinterest Categories

5. Organize and Optimize Boards

Your keyword and consumer research for Pinterest should be a core consideration when you start to create boards. They provide a great opportunity to tell Pinterest’s search engine how you categorize your products, which will only aid visibility. They are also the first thing users will see when they come to your profile, so it is worth thinking this through.

Nordstrom is often cited as the market leader in this sense. Their boards cover pretty much every interaction one could reasonably expect a consumer to have with their brand.

This consumer insight is combined with a subtle nod to keyword search trends, with board titles including ‘Style Under $100’, ‘Winter Fashion’, and ‘Beach Wedding Ideas’. They steer clear of disrupting the user experience and still manage to include popular keywords.

Nordstrom Pinterest

This approach should be seen as the blueprint for creating and optimizing Pinterest boards. However, boards need to be populated with high-quality Pins if they are to gain popularity.

6. Get to Know the Anatomy of a Pin

There is art and science to the creation of a perfect Pin. Although there will always be an instinctual creative drive behind the best campaigns, there are still some clear rules of thumb that we should all follow.

  • Get your proportions right. The optimal aspect ratio for a Pin is 2:3 (600 px wide by 900 px high). This is particularly important on mobile, but Pinterest prefers to display longer images on desktop too.
  • Use multiple colors. Images with multiple dominant colors get re-pinned 3.25 times more than their monochrome counterparts.
  • Have a purpose. We need to understand the purpose of each Pin. Users create mood boards that they will return to multiple times, after all. Think about how you can be of repeat value to someone, rather than just pushing commercial messages. Step-by-step guides and tutorials work well in this regard.

7. Be Descriptive

It’s important to get descriptions right for SEO on Pinterest. For all of its significant merits as a visual discovery platform, text still matters. Don’t be afraid to include detail, as this will help Pinterest locate and serve your images for relevant searches.

A great way to do this is to use the description space to add to your image, rather than just repeating what it says via text. Tell your audience how the product will benefit them, how they can use it, or an interesting fact about the product they wouldn’t otherwise know.

You can include up to 500 characters, which can all be viewed when a user clicks to see your Pin. There is typically no need to go to that upper limit, however. A couple of sentences of around 100 characters in total is sufficient to provide some good detail.

Avoid using hashtags in your descriptions. These tend to be distracting and don’t add anything in the way of ranking value.

8. Aim for Engagement

User engagement is of paramount importance on Pinterest. The following tips can improve your engagement metrics and increase your search visibility:

  • Link your Pinterest account to your other social media accounts. This will increase awareness within your existing followers on other platforms.
  • Invite relevant Pinterest influencers to collaborate on a board to grow your own following.
  • Include text as an overlay on your images. As we can see for a search like [summer cocktails], Pins with a text overlay tend to rank well:

Pinterest Cocktails

  • Use a website like Canva to create mosaics and multi-image Pins. This allows a bit more freedom for creativity and room to include more within Pinterest’s vertical image format.
  • Pin frequently. This study from Buffer found that you should aim for at least five Pins per day. These Pins can be scheduled ahead of time.
  • Follow relevant boards. This will start to build up a network in relation to your profile.
  • Measure your performance. Pinterest analytics will give you a lot of insight into how your profile is performing in organic search, and integrated dashboards like Datorama can now pull in Pinterest data.

9. Consider Visual Search and ‘Related Items’

Pinterest’s Lens technology is a market leader in visual search. By pointing a smartphone camera at a household item or piece of clothing, Pinterest can identify the object and suggest thematically related Pins.

Lens is a fascinating piece of technology that will reward content creators who put the time and effort into image optimization. This involves the SEO basics, but it extends beyond this into collaboration with photographers and designers.

Going back to a screenshot I used earlier in this article, I also uploaded this image to Pinterest to see how the platform evaluates content. Of interest here is the visual similarity between the image I posted and the Related Pins below (apart from the paid ad for bed linen on the right-hand side).

Pinterest Pie Charts

Pinterest is getting a lot better at understanding the component parts of an image. Its image recognition technology has identified the pie charts in my screenshot and suggested other popular pie chart-based posts. I made no reference to the shapes within my description, so Pinterest has had to figure this one out on its own.

This is important to note. If SEO comprises anything that helps content rank organically, on Pinterest we need to be thinking about aesthetics in tandem with keywords.

10. Don’t Forget About Google

Pinterest takes SEO seriously. They know that it is a cost-effective way to drive traffic, but they also know it takes a lot of work. This fascinating post on Medium from 2015 details exactly how fanatical Pinterest are about finding the right SEO formula.

They rank for a lot of keywords, as a result.

The screenshot below is taken from Searchmetrics and shows the significant improvement Pinterest has seen over the past 5 years.

Pinterest Visibility - SEO

We can make great use of Pinterest as a platform for our own SEO efforts.

By identifying the relevant keywords that Pinterest ranks for, we can optimize for the most profitable queries with our Pins and boards. If Pinterest deems you relevant enough to rank for that keyword via its own search algorithms, your organic Pinterest traffic will increase significantly.

This will allow you to prioritize your Pinterest SEO efforts, as you can target the keywords that will drive most value from both Pinterest search and Google search.

Source: 10 Pinterest SEO Tips That Will Set You up for Success – Search Engine Journal

15- Jun2017
Posted By: DPadmin
108 Views

Be a mad scientist to be more successful in local SEO

With my recaps of the Local SEO sessions at SMX West last month, we had a bit of a break from Greg’s Soapbox. Never fear, it’s back in full force this month!

I’ve been lucky enough to have the opportunity to attend several large conferences over the last few months, and I have been a part of many discussions about what really works for local SEO. It seems that most people fall into one of two camps, and there’s a growing debate between the two.

On one side, we have people who hold the annual Local Search Ranking Factors (LSRF) survey, now run by Darren Shaw at Whitespark, as gospel. On the other, you have the anti-LSRF group, who think that the LSRF study is opinion-based poppycock (yes, someone actually called it “poppycock”). This side favors the insights gleaned from Andrew Shotland and Dan Leibson’s massive study of local ranking factors, in which they attempted to reverse-engineer Google’s local algorithm.

In many cases, but not all, the results of the study align with those of the survey — but in some cases, there’s a huge difference.

As I sat through these many conversations and debates over the last few months, I noticed something unsettling. Nearly every person I talked to on either “side” of the question seemed to fall into that camp by blind faith. They believed one way or the other because that’s the side of the fence they were “raised on,” so to speak.

Forget what anyone says — test it for yourself!

Maybe I’m just wearing my (officially licensed and available for sale) Greg’s Soapbox Tinfoil Hat, but in my entire career as an SEO, I’ve never simply accepted anything as the truth. I’ve always thought of myself as a bit of a mad scientist, conducting crazy experiments to see what really worked… and I’m incredibly surprised that so many people don’t look at things the same way!

It’s insane to read a blog post or two, or see a dynamic speaker at a conference, or even listen to your boss and trust that you’re hearing the absolute best truth. We all know there are hundreds of factors that influence the relevancy of a site, and being local SEOs, we know that Google treats different business types and even different search queries in vastly different ways.

Don’t get me wrong — I’m not knocking the Local Search Ranking Factors study. I’ve been a participant for years, and I firmly believe it’s an amazing tool for anyone in the industry. But I also think that Shotland and Leibson have the right idea: you simply must test things for yourself to be sure that things really work the way you expect them to.

To geo-optimize or not to geo-optimize?

The perfect example is geo-optimization. Most old-school local SEOs will tell you exactly how to optimize a page for a geo term, inserting it in the title tag, H1, content, alt text, URL and so on. On the flip side, the correlations in Shotland and Leibson’s study show that geo-optimization doesn’t really do anything. So who’s right?

I’m on Greg’s Soapbox, so I’m right. Here’s the answer: none of us is right.

In some cases, geo-optimization might not do squat for a website. If it’s a competitive vertical, and every site has geo-optimized out the wazoo, then of course it won’t work. It’s exactly the same issue I discussed in my post last fall about unique content no longer being important because everyone is unique.

In other verticals that might be a bit behind or a bit less competitive, geo-optimization can be a huge game-changer. If you’re working on a site, and it’s the only one in the local market that’s well-optimized for that city, then boom — you win!

The issue is this: neither the LSRF results or Shotland and Leibson’s test will tell you what’s right for your own site or your clients’ sites. You’re going to have to test things for yourself to find out what really matters.

The Local Search Ranking Factors study is incredibly valuable because it points you in what’s probably a good direction. The 40 or so participants in the study are at the absolute top of the local SEO game, and I know for a fact that every single one of them is always testing. It’s a good bet that if the LSRF study points you in a direction, it’s a smart choice to follow and test that factor for yourself.

Same thing with Shotland and Leibson’s test — there’s a good chance their data is pure gold as well, and it should give you a starting point for your own tests.

Regardless of which camp you fall into, don’t trust anything on blind faith. Become a mad scientist and test things for yourself — you’ll be a better SEO, and you’ll get much better results for your clients.

Source: http://searchengineland.com/mad-scientist-successful-local-seo-273241

14- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
199 Views

AdWords Automated Bidding Gets An Overhaul: Welcome, Portfolio Bid Strategies

Terminology changes come with some new functionality, including the ability to set different CPA targets at the ad group level within the same bid strategy.

Google is going to be rolling out a revamp of AdWords automated bidding. Some of the changes are just semantic, but the workflow is also getting an update.

First the naming changes:

  1. Flexible strategies will be called “portfolio” bid strategies. The change is meant to better indicate that a single strategy can be applied across multiple campaigns, ad groups — and keywords, in some cases.
  2. A strategy that is applied to a single campaign is called a “standard” bid strategy.
  3. Conversion Optimizer will be called Target CPA for all new bid strategies to simplify the nomenclature. Target CPA can still be applied as a “standard” or a “portfolio” bid strategy.

Now for the functionality updates:

  1. Managers will be able to create or add to bidding strategies from the Campaigns Setting tab — no more need to dive into the Shared Library.
  2. Portfolio bid strategies for Target CPA can have different CPA goals for separate ad groups. “For example, if you’re a clothing retailer with multiple ‘Accessories’ ad groups in a bidding portfolio, you may want to set a lower CPA target for ‘Socks’ compared to other product categories with higher average order value.”

Adwords target CPA bid strategy

Note that Portfolio bid strategies can not be applied to video or universal app campaigns

.The periodic Table of SEO success factors

In December, Google added new reporting features for automated bidding. These latest updates will start showing up in accounts over the next few weeks.Google Adwords

Source: AdWords Automated Bidding Gets An Overhaul: Welcome, Portfolio Bid Strategies