14- Aug2017
Posted By: DPadmin
193 Views

How to Show Up on the First Page of Google (Even if You’re a Nobody) | Neil Patel

first page

There’s a joke that asks, “Where should you bury something that you don’t want people to find?”

Answer: On the second page of Google.

Sure, it’s corny. But there’s still some truth to that statement.

75% of people will never scroll past the first page on a Google search.

That means you can’t afford to be ranking on the second, third, or fourth page.

You just won’t get the clicks and traffic you need to make SEO worth your time and money.

And you need that organic traffic because 93% of online experiences begin with a search engine.

On top of that, there are over 1 trillion searches every single month!

A good SEO presence has the power to drive inbound traffic that could grow your business for years to come.

But the average-joe website owner doesn’t have the power to rank on the first page of Google for the best keywords.

There are already countless high-profile websites capitalizing on the top industry keywords.

And there are thousands of other bloggers trying to rank for that keyword as well.

That means the deck is stacked. And it’s not in your favor.

You shouldn’t give up, though! There are a few proven methods that I’ve used and found success with to show up on the first page of Google.

And the best part is that you don’t need the authority or links to rank for many of these keywords.

I can teach you how to show up for them anyway.

First, I’ll explain why you’re doomed for now.

And second, I’ll show you how to use this problem to your advantage to rank on the first page of Google despite your shortcomings.

Ready to get started? Let’s do it.

Why you probably can’t rank on the first page of Google anytime soon

I’m going to be straight with you:

You’re pretty much doomed. If you’re trying to get noticed and rank organically on the first page for popular industry keywords like “SEO Guide,” it’s not going to happen anytime soon.

If you’re just starting out, you’ve got no domain authority, a tiny backlink profile, and hardly any traction as a result.

And if you take a look at Google’s first page results for “SEO Guide,” you’ll quickly see what the major problem you’re up against is:

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See what I mean? The domain authorities of these top page rankings are going to blow any new website out of the water.

Moz? 93 domain authority. Kissmetrics? 85.

How many backlinks does that #1 spot have? 18,389 to be exact.

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That’s more than most of us will get on our entire site. Ever.

Plus, these guides have been up for years!

The Beginner’s Guide to SEO from Moz has been up for five years or so. Their website claims that over three million people have read it.

You get the idea.

Sites that have been around for a long time are going to dominate the top page rankings for popular industry keywords.

These people are producing stellar content and getting countless backlinks to their content.

If you’re just starting out, you need to pursue different strategies.

You can’t afford to wait around for five years to rank on the bottom of the first page for “SEO Guide.” Not with the number of hours and dollars it would take.

But that’s OK!

Just realize that you’re not going to rank organically for it right now.

The good news is that you don’t need to. There’s still hope.

The trick is to readjust your strategy and use different methods to still show up for your target keywords.

Here’s how to do it.

1. Start by dominating long-tail keywords

There are more long-tail keywords out there than big, popular ones.

Here’s a simple comparison to explain the difference:

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And my own beautifully simple example:

  • ‘Head’ keyword = “SEO guide”
  • Long-tail =  “SEO guide for small businesses 2017”

Each might not send you a ton of traffic. However, long-tail keywords do in total when you add a bunch of them up.

For example, I was able to increase my organic traffic to 173,336 visitors monthly using a long-tail strategy.

Long-tail searches also make up the majority of searches on Google.

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You should target these long-tail keywords because they’re easier to rank for. And that means they’ll usually take less time and money.

So you’re not going up against the mammoth, industry-leading companies on these search engine result pages (SERPs).

Still skeptical of the power of long-tail strategies? I was, too, at first!But then I read about how Amazon makes 57% of their sales from long-tail keywords.

How? Because long-tail searches are looking for very specific information, whereas short-tail keywords are more general.

If you can give the searcher specific information, they’re going to stick around and convert.

Here’s an example SERP of a long-tail keyword search to help you get an idea of how it’s possible to rank for them.

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Do you notice that the SERP isn’t overcrowded with industry influencers and top blogs?

Sure, there are still a few in there, but the top-ranking sites are ones that you’ve probably never heard of.

Instead of going up against a website with a 93 domain authority, here’s what the first ranking page for this long-tail search query looks like:

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Now I’ve got your attention, right?

So sure, this keyword might have lower search volume than “SEO Guide.”

But remember that these long-tail keyword conversion rates are almost always higher.

And you know what I preach:

Traffic doesn’t mean anything if people don’t convert!If you’re getting 50,000 visitors a month from a popular keyword, but nobody is converting, it’s not doing you much good.

Instead of putting all your eggs in one basket for “SEO Guide,” create more content and optimize it for long-tail searches to dominate the SERPs!

Now let’s talk about a few ways to rank for the more popular terms that you just can’t seem to resist. And let’s do it without any ‘classic’ SEO.

2. Pay to reach the top of the AdWords search network

AdWords?

Now, you may be thinking, “Neil, my friend, my mentor, you do know that AdWords is not organic search, right?”

Well, just hear me out on this one, okay?

I’m going to start this one off with an example because it’s the only way to understand how truly effective this strategy can be.

So let’s fire up a search for “Best CRM.”

Here’s what the results page looks like:

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It looks a bit different, doesn’t it? There’s not a single organic result until you scroll past the fold.

You’ve got four AdWords search network ads and a featured snippet from a single organic result.

It takes the user multiple steps just to reach the organic results and decide what to click on this SERP.

But something even more important jumps out at me here.

The keyword intent and the results that appear don’t line up.

Here’s what I mean.

Check out the first three ads:

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They all talk about their own CRM and say that they’re the best in the industry.

That’s not surprising, necessarily. Everyone wants their products and services to be seen as the best.

But for this search, that’s a problem.

And more importantly, this is an opportunity for you to show up for that keyword.Here’s why.

What are people looking for when they type in “Best CRM?”

Are they looking for Salesforce or Zoho or Pipedrive right now?

No. They’re looking for a CRM comparison to see which one is the best. They want to consider their alternatives and options before deciding.

You can validate this by looking at the organic results, which all feature comparison articles and reviews.

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Google wants to help the searcher find what they’re looking for as fast as possible.

That means the top organic results usually reflect the searcher’s intent.

So instead of looking for a branded PPC ad about one product being the best, a searcher is looking for CRM comparisons!

Now, do you remember those top 3 PPC results? They’re probably not getting any clicks because they’re not answering the searcher’s question.

The content doesn’t match the intent behind the search query.

But look at the 4th result:

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If I were a betting man (which I am), I’d bet you that this low-domain-authority website is getting countless clicks for “Best CRM.”

I’d bet that this ad outperforms the ones above it.

This no-name site can rank with the big boys because they’ve done a better job matching keyword intent with their ad.

It’s practically cheating the system, and it works perfectly.

Now check out all of the traffic you have the opportunity to steal without competing for it head-on with massive brands in the organic rankings:

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Instead of preaching about their product, the fourth ad lines up their content to look exactly like the organic results.

However, they show up before the organic results with no effort spent on link building.

You don’t need to organically rank for a keyword to get traffic for that keyword. Just remember to match the searcher’s intent and mimic the organic results to drive traffic.

3. Write more blog posts than your competition

What’s the downside of a long-tail keyword strategy?

You can’t stuff a bunch of random keywords onto the same page. You should still focus on one or two keywords per post, max.

That means you’re going to have to create a lot more content!

This is no great secret.

If you write more content, you’ve got a better shot at ranking on the first page of Google.

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The more you write, the more pages get indexed, and the more traffic you bring to your site.

If you’re writing 5-10 posts a month, it’s still not enough.

Your competition and industry leaders are writing 16+ every single month.

You can’t reasonably expect to outrank a competitor or catch up to an industry leader by writing less, can you?

No way.

You need to write like your business depends on it. Because based on the information above, it does!

And it can’t be any old 500-word blog post that you slap together in an hour.

Here’s what the top content on Google looks like on average.

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Everything on the first page of Google is over 2,000 words.

That means that you need to write more in-depth content that guides users through the process of solving their problems.

This content should be actionable and filled with images, examples, and step-by-step instructions.

Now is about the time when you start thinking, “How on Earth am I going to carve out time to write more?”

If that’s the case, maybe you need to hire someone.

The good news is that content marketing costs 62% less than other marketing mediums. All while generating 3x the number of leads.

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If you want to start ranking for the top keywords, you need to produce valuable, unique content — and lots of it.

On top of that, you also need to optimize your content to generate the highest CTR possible.

Why? Because optimizing headlines and meta descriptions for searchers can result in a 10% increase in CTR.

And an increase in CTR means you’re on your way to ranking higher.

Here’s an example:

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Why do you think this Search Engine Land post outranks the post below it?

Take a look at that headline!

Instead of a basic headline, they make you think about what you just searched.

It goes against the grain of normal, acceptable advice. It’s like a pattern interruption that causes you to stop what you’re doing.

Now you’re rethinking everything you once thought was true!

Here are a few powerful headline templates to try immediately to boost your organic CTR:

[ ______________ ] Using These 5 Strategic Moves
10 Quick Moves to [ ________________ ] and Increase Revenue
How I Used These 5 Moves to [ ____________ ]

Interested in more headline tips to increase your CTR and boost your rankings? Start with my in-depth guide on headlines.

4. Get reviewed and featured in round-ups

Sometimes, spending money on PPC ads to rank higher for keywords isn’t an option.

Spending too much time and money on creating long-form guides to rank for your desired keywords also may not be feasible.

Luckily, you can still get your name featured in top-ranking content! All while doing a fraction of the work.

Rather than having your official site placed on the top page of Google from AdWords or organic rankings, you can get featured in round-up posts with minimal time and effort.

Here’s what I mean:

Just go to Google and search “best SEO tools 2017”:

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All the results are roundup-style posts in which the authors review and analyze the top tools.

It’s basically free advertising.

You can get your name out to thousands upon thousands of consumers a month who are clicking on those top-ranking posts.

For example, let’s click on the first result from PC Magazine:

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They cover each SEO tool, providing reviews of each feature the tools have and then helping to prioritize them for everyone else.

Now, you can use these roundup-style posts to your advantage. Rank well on these posts, and you’ll get tons of traffic in return.

For example, thousands of people are already searching for “SEO tools.”

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Then you can conduct outreach to have your tool featured in those comparisons.

And that traffic can be huge:

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If you’re featured on all of the comparison posts that already rank on the top page, you’re going to get traffic from each one of those.

And this traffic will already be primed to buy from you.

A few simple outreach efforts can now save you years of grinding away in obscurity to get your brand in front of eager searchers.

No time, no money, and just a little effort can still get your brand in the top results.

If the deck is stacked against you in one game, just switch the game that you’re playing.

Conclusion

Showing up on the first page of Google is nearly impossible if you’re just starting out.

That’s harsh, but it’s also true.

Industry leaders who’ve been producing content for years dominate all of the best keywords and SERPs.

Many of them have been spending millions on big-budget ad campaigns, too.

So you can’t expect to rank first when you’re new.

The competition is already so far out ahead. They’ve been accumulating thousands of links and countless shares while this business was still a twinkle in your eye.

Their brands are well-established, and their authority is too high.

But you still need organic traffic to thrive and keep your business growing.

Thankfully, there are a few workarounds.

Try researching and producing content for long-tail keywords. The volume might be lower, but so is the competition.

Use sneaky tactics like PPC ads to rank above the organic results for an extremely popular ‘head’ keyword that you know you’ll never be able to rank for organically.

Try getting reviewed in roundup-style posts to get featured on top articles.

There’s plenty of unconventional methods to get your brand in front of the traffic that you crave.

You just have to get a little creative and understand that you might not always rank for the top terms.

But other methods exist to get similar results if you know where to look.

What strategies have you used to rank on the first page of Google?

Source: How to Show Up on the First Page of Google (Even if You’re a Nobody)

11- Jul2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
357 Views

Redesigning the Remote: How Online Video Changes the Way Viewers Tune In – Think with Google

Video used to be confined to a TV screen in the living room. If people wanted to watch the game, snuggle up with a romantic comedy, or see what was happening in the world, they picked up a remote and flipped through the channels.

Mobile has changed all of that, allowing viewers to tune in from virtually anywhere and at any time. According to a recent study, one in three adults between ages 18 and 54 use their smartphone as their primary device for watching online video.1

These new viewing habits have changed the nature of in-home viewing. Half of YouTube users who watch YouTube videos on their smartphones watch while at home.2 But just because people can watch on mobile doesn’t mean they’re only watching on mobile. In fact, the time people spend watching YouTube on a TV screen has more than doubled year over year.3

One in three adults between ages 18 and 54 use their smartphone as their primary device for watching online video.

Related Story

Evolution of TV: Reaching Audiences Across Screens

As TV content shifts to internet, audiences fragment, creating complexities for distributors, programmers, and advertisers.

To learn more about the role of online video in people’s lives today—and what that implies for brands—Google partnered with Flamingo and Ipsos Connect to conduct a survey and interview consumers about how they watch and where. We found that people use different screens for different reasons, including the type of content.

Whether people want to master a specific look or to see who won on last night’s awards show, those who watch beauty, fashion,4 entertainment, and pop culture5 YouTube videos prefer to watch on their smartphones. “The day after the Oscars, I watched a ‘top moments from last night’ kind of video on my way to work,” says Jim in New York.

“I like watching beauty videos by bloggers on my phone when I’m putting on my own makeup,” says Veronica in Chicago. “It’s kind of like talking to a friend when I’m getting ready.”

 

Mobile Has Changed The Way We Watch | YouTube Advertisers

For travel6 and food7 videos, people primarily watch on their desktop or laptop. “I watched a video about Patagonia on my computer,” Kylie in New York says. “I was already on my computer going through some emails and stuff, and it came up on my inbox.”

People who watch beauty, fashion, entertainment, and pop culture YouTube videos prefer to watch on their smartphones.

TV is still where people turn most often for news,8 sports,9 and comedy,10though. For some people that were interviewed, group viewing works best with a larger screen. “We cast a lot when we have people over, mostly just funny or entertaining YouTube videos,” says Paul in Chicago. “A big group of our friends will come over and we’ll each go round sharing our favorite videos on the TV screen.”

What this means for your brand

Related Story

How Online Video Influences Your Audience

Understanding how the rise of mobile video can help improve your brand metrics.

The consumer shift to mobile creates significant new opportunities for your brand to connect to your audience. Here are two ways you can plan for this world that’s driven by preferences and online video trends:

  • Follow the video: Your consumers are following their passions with online video, from their smartphones to their computers to their TVs. Ask yourself: Can people watch your videos on all devices? Are you thinking holistically about video on all screens?
  • Understand the context: Think about what’s happening in the moment when consumers are watching your ad. Where are they? What are they doing? What device are they on? Figure out what is likely to be their mindset in that moment, and choose the best ad format, length, and placement accordingly.

Watch this video to learn more about how to adapt your online video content to reach your consumer:

 

The Near Frontier of Mobile Video | YouTube Advertisers

 

Sources
1 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=2,397, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch online video, Feb. 2016.
2 YouTube Data, 2016.
3 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=2,091, among adults aged 18–54 who visit YouTube at least monthly, Feb. 2016.
4 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=580, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch Beauty & Fashion content at least monthly on YouTube, Feb. 2016.
5 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=569, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch Entertainment & Pop Culture content at least monthly on YouTube, Feb. 2016.
6 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=1,984, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch Travel content, Feb. 2016.
7 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=2,171, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch Food & Recipes content, Feb. 2016.
8 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=2,328, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch News content, Feb. 2016.
9 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=1,919, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch Sports content, Feb. 2016.
10 Google/Ipsos Connect, “Cross-device Viewing Behavior Study,” U.S., n=2,298, among adults aged 18–54 who go online at least monthly and watch Comedy content, Feb. 2016.

 

Source: Redesigning the Remote: How Online Video Changes the Way Viewers Tune In – Think with Google

19- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
429 Views

App Store SEO: The Inbound Marketer’s Guide to Mobile – Moz

As the app ecosystem grows, many marketers are turning their sights towards mobile app marketing. Today’s post provides a high-level view of App Store Optimization, and gives tips on how to break into the rapidly expanding world of apps.

How to Optimize for App Store Search Engines

Let’s dive into search in the app stores, and how the search engines differ based on platform.

First things first; remember I mentioned that the app ecosystem reminds me of the web in the mid-to-late 90’s? Keep that picture in your head when you think of search. App store search hasn’t been “figured out” in the same way that Google “figured out” search on the web. Simply put, we’re still in AltaVista mode in the app ecosystem: something better than Yahoo’s directory provided, but not incredibly sophisticated like Google would become in a few more years.

Just like the web has on-page and off-page SEO, apps have on-metadata and off-metadata ASO. On-metadata ASO include factors totally within your control and are often things dealing with your app store presence. Off-metadata ASO include factors that might not be entirely in your control, but which you can still influence. Here are a few of the most important knobs and levers that you as a marketer can turn to affect your search performance, and some quick tips on how to optimize them.

On-Metadata

App Title

An app’s title is the single most important metadata factor for rank in ASO. It’s equivalent to the <title> tag in your HTML, and is a great signal to the app stores as to what your app is about. On the web, you want your title to include both a description of what you do (including keywords) as well as some branding; both elements should also exist in the app store. Be sure to include the keywords, but don’t be spammy. Make sure it parses well and makes sense. Example: “Strava Run – GPS Running, Training and Cycling Workout Tracker

Description

Patrick Haig, our VP of Customer Success, likes to break descriptions down into two sections: above the fold and below the fold (sound familiar?). He says, “Above the fold language should be 1-2 sentences describing the app and its primary use case, and below the fold should have a clear and engaging feature set and social proof.” We’ll dig into some of the differences about the description field across platforms below.

Keyword Field

The Keyword Field in iOS is a 100 character field which you can use to tell iTunes search for which keywords you should show up. Since you only get 100 characters, you must use them wisely. A few tips:

  • When choosing your keywords, just like on the web, focus on relevancy, search volume, and difficulty.
  • Don’t use multiple word phrases; break out to individual words (Apple can combine them for you).
  • Don’t repeat keywords that are already in your title (and put the most important ones in your title, leaving the keyword field for your secondary keywords).
  • Separate keywords with commas, and don’t use spaces anywhere.

Icon

Consumers are finicky. They want apps which are beautiful, elegant, and simple to understand. Your icon is often their first interaction with your app, so ensure that it does a great job conveying your brand, and the elegance and usefulness of your app. Remember, in search results, an icon is one of the only ways you can convey your brand and usefulness. Think of it as part of the meta description tag you’d create in SEO. For example, SoundCloud does a great job with their icon and branding.

Screenshots

The most important rule to remember when creating your screenshots is that they should not be screenshots. They are, instead, promotional graphics. That means you can include text or other graphics to tell your app’s story in an interesting, visual way.

Especially in iOS, where the card layout shows your first screenshot, it is incredibly helpful when an app displays a graphic which explains the app right up front, increasing conversions from search results to viewing the app page and, ultimately, installing the app.

The best app marketers also use their screenshots promotional graphics together to create a flow that carries the user through the story. Each graphic can build off the previous graphic, giving the user a reason to continue scrolling and learning about your app.

Here’s a great example of using the screenshots effectively by our friends at Haiku Deck.

As the app ecosystem grows, many marketers are turning their sights towards mobile app marketing.

Off-Metadata

Outside of your direct control, you’ll also want to focus on a few things to ensure the best performance in ASO.

Ratings

Average Ratings

Every app has a rating. Your job as a marketer is to ensure that your app gets a great overall rating. Rating is directly tied to performance in app store search, which leads us to believe that rating is a factor in app store search rankings.

Reviews

Similar to ratings, you want to ensure that the reviews your users write about your app are positive. These reviews will help increase your conversion rate from app page views to downloads.

For a great product to help you increase your rating and reviews, check out Apptentive.

Link-building

This is discussed further below, but suffice it to say, link building to your app’s page in the app store matters for Google Play apps. Given you all are SEOs, you know all about how to rock this!

How Do iOS and Google Play Differ In App Store Search?

The differences in the platforms mean that there are different levers to pull depending on the platform. Google Play and iOS act completely independently, and often, quite differently. The differences are wide-ranging, but what are a couple of the main differences?

In general, the way to think about the differences is that Google is Google and Apple is Apple. Duh, right? Google has the built the infrastructure and technology to learn from the web and use many different data points to make a decision. Apple, on the other hand, doesn’t have indexes of the web, and comes from a background in media. When in doubt, imagine what you’d do if you were each of them and had the history each of them has.

Here are a couple concrete examples.

Description versus Keywords

In iOS, there’s a keywords field. It’s easy to see where this came from, especially when you think of iTunes’ background in music: a song has a title (app title), musician (developer name), and then needs a few keywords to describe the song (“motown,” “reggae,” etc.). When Apple launched their app store, they used the same technology that was already built for music, which meant that the app title, developer name, and keywords were the only fields used to understand search for an app. Note that description isn’t taken into account in iOS (but I expect this to change soon).

On the other hand, there is no keyword field in Google Play; there is only a description field. Thus, while iOS doesn’t take the description into account, in Google Play the description is all you have, so be sure to do exactly the same as you do on the web: cater your content towards your keywords, without being spammy.

Leveraging PageRank in Google Play

Another big difference in iOS and Google Play is that Google has access to PageRank and the link graph of the web, while Apple does not. Thus, Google will take into account the inbound links to your app’s detail page (for example, https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.symantec.mobilesecurity) as a factor in Google Play search, while Apple has no such factor.


How To Measure Success In App Marketing

It’s very difficult to measure success in app marketing in the same way you can measure success in web marketing. This is especially true when you’re working with inbound channels. It’s still early, but it’s continuously getting better, with more tools and services coming out all the time to help marketers understand success. Here are some of the ways I recommend measuring success in the app store today:

Search Rankings

Just like on the web, a great way to measure your success in app store search is to track your ranking for specific search terms you care about over time and versus your competition. Rank tracking is incredibly valuable for ASOs to understand their progress.

Top Charts

Top Charts, especially Top Charts within a particular category, do a great job of allowing you to understand your success in relation to the rest of the apps in your category.

As the app ecosystem grows, many marketers are turning their sights towards mobile app marketing.

Ratings and Reviews

Just as ratings and reviews will help your ASO, they are also great metrics to track over time for how you’re doing with your app marketing. Keep track of what users are saying, how they’re saying it (pro tip: listening to their language is a great way to do keyword research!), and what they’re rating your app.

Downloads

Taking it one step further, correlating your search rankings to downloads will allow you to understand the effect your increased ASO is having on your app performance. One way we do this is to integrate with iTunes Connect and overlay your search rankings with your downloads so you can visually see how closely related any one keyword is with your downloads. It’s not perfect, but it helps!

Conversion and Revenue

At the end of the day, revenue is the most important metric you should be understanding. Of course, you should be tracking your revenue and doing the same correlation with search performance. In addition, you should watch your conversion rate over time; we often see apps whose conversion rate soars with an increase in ASO because the users are so much more engaged with the app.


Tools And Resources To Use To Help With App Marketing

To conclude this post, I want to quickly talk about some tools and resources to use to help your app marketing process.

Sylvain has written some great content and has some incredible insights into app marketing and ASO on his company’s (Apptamin) blog.

I mentioned Apptentive above, and they really are the best way I know to impact your ratings and reviews, and get great feedback from customers in the process.

In addition to having a great, free, in-app analytics product (Flurry Analytics), as well as an interesting paid advertising product (AppCircle), Flurry also posts some of the most interesting data about the app ecosystem on their blog.

If you’re looking to obtain some amount of attribution for your paid advertising (inbound can’t be split out, sorry!), MobileAppTracking is where it’s at. It allows you to understand which paid channels are performing best for you based on the metric of your choosing. Best of all, you only pay for what you use.

App Marketing Tools

This is, of course, a shameless promotion. That said, our product is a great way to understand your performance in app store search, help you do keyword research, and give you competitive intelligence. We offer a free (forever!) tool for Indie developers and scale all the way up to the largest Enterprise customers.


Now It’s Your Turn–> Visit the link below to get the full list to help guide you along your optimization way!

Source: App Store SEO: The Inbound Marketer’s Guide to Mobile – Moz

18- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
243 Views

SEO is a Long-Term Investment- Marketers Feel Pressure

Even though SEO is a long-term investment, marketers often feel pressured to show progress quickly. Columnist Dan Bagby for Searchengineland provides some ideas for quick wins that can show value while waiting for your longer-term initiatives to start gaining traction.

Even though SEO is a long-term investment, marketers often feel pressured to show progress quicklyWhen you start at a new company as the SEO specialist or pick up a new client, one thing everyone wants is to see quick results. The fact that SEO takes time can be a struggle as you try to show value while also satisfying your own desire to make an impact.

Here are a few SEO techniques that will let your colleagues or clients know you are the real deal, bringing value with your expertise.

1. Win With Featured Snippets

Winning a featured snippet spot can have a huge impact, bringing organic traffic to a page. Although getting featured in the quick answer box is not guaranteed, there is a pretty simple formula for optimizing your content for it.

Even though SEO is a long-term investment, marketers often feel pressured to show progress quicklyStart by going to the Google Search Console to find rankings for queries that contain a question — you can do this by filtering for queries containing “how,” “what” or “why.”

Once you have a list of keyword phrases, check search volume and prioritize your list, focusing on the keywords with the highest search volume. If you do not currently rank for any question-related keywords, think of a simple question you can answer, and create the content to answer that question.

Increase your chances of being featured in the quick answer box by making on-page improvements:

  1. Provide a detailed answer in a bulleted or numbered format that specifically answers the question posed by the search query.
  2. Add a video to the page that answers the question (with transcription).
  3. Add additional information that adds more value to the page for the reader.

Once your content has been revised, submit it to be indexed, and share it on Google Plus, so that the changes are noticed quickly. To learn more about optimizing for featured snippets, check out this article by Eric Enge.

2. Optimize Existing Content

It is much easier to improve a strong existing page’s ranking a few spots in the SERPs than it is to get a new (or poorly ranking) page to show quick results.

Knowing that you see the biggest bumps in traffic when you get into the top three results, target content ranked in position 3 to 10. Improving bounce rates or building on pages that are converting can also be a great way to see big gains from a small time investment.

There are several ways to identify which pages to focus on:

  1. Going back to the Search Console, sort keywords by rank to find keywords ranked between 10 and 3.
  2. Looking in Google Analytics, find pages with a high bounce rate but decent traffic.
  3. Also in Google Analytics, find pages with high conversion rates. Check what keywords are driving traffic through Search Console, and focus on optimizing for those keywords.

What can you do to improve these pages and see results quickly? Here are some ideas

On-Page Optimization

  • Modifying the basic on-page ranking factors to improve search engine optimization.
  • Find internal pages that are related to your target pages, and create new internal links from the related pages to the target pages.
  • Share on Google Plus and submit to Google to be crawled.

Crowd Source Content For Quick Links

One way to quickly improve a page’s content (and possibly gain links) is by reaching out to influencers. Keep it simple by asking influencers to contribute to a page you are trying to improve.

For example, if you have a page you wrote about the best places to eat in Austin, you could reach out to food bloggers in Austin and ask them for their opinion on the best new restaurants.

Even more effective is to ask them if they have a blog post about those specific restaurants that you can link to. They will gladly give you content to link to while you get more content to add to your page.

Once the updates are made, let the influencers know by email and via Twitter. This can result in additional social shares and possibly links for the influencers. You can also use this technique when you are creating a brand-new page.

Optimizing For Search Intent

I often find pages ranking well for queries that do not fit the page. For example, I might see an article ranking for queries related to “finding influencers” that is really more focused on how to reach out to influencers. Fixing this will likely improve rank and lower bounce rate.

  1. If the page does not rank for other keywords, and the keywords currently driving traffic are strategic for your site, rewrite the article completely focusing on those keywords.
  2. If you want to maintain the article, you can add a section to better answer the query that it already ranks for.
  3. If the information that would match the search intent does not belong on the page, write a new page that answers the questions, and link to it from the ranking post with keyword-rich anchor text.

3. Improve Rank For Converting Pages

Look at Google Analytics to find the pages that are converting. Use Search Console to find the keywords driving traffic to that page. You can also look at paid campaigns to see top-converting keywords.

Focus on these keywords and pages to see quick results and really prove the value in SEO.

4. Find Competing Content

Check your site for several pieces of content on the same topic and combine the pages. Make sure to redirect URLs so that there is only one page.

5. Fixing 404 Errors

There are several tools that make it easy to find 404 errors. You can fix links by reaching out to site owners that have the broken links or redirect the broken URL to a live page.

Final Thoughts

While SEO is a long-term investment and can take time to show results, there are always a few things you can do to show quick value. I have included only included a few opportunities here, but there are many other techniques like using other sites to get content ranking quickly. What are some of your techniques to get quick results?

is a long-term investment, marketers often feel pressured to show progress quickly. Columnist Dan Bagby provides some ideas for quick wins that can show value while waiting for your longer-term initiatives to start gaining traction.

Source: Quick Wins To Beat The SEO Waiting Game

16- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
298 Views

Special Edition Batman v Superman Galaxy S7 Edge Coming? | Digital Trends

 

The Dark Knight and the Man of Steel will finally do battle on March 25, with Samsung possibly cooking up a special-edition Galaxy S7 Edge to commemorate the occasion, reports South Korean outlet Naver.

According to the publication, Samsung will launch a Batman v Superman edition of the Galaxy S7 Edge, which will reportedly be decked out with wallpaper, ringtone, and a design based on the movie. However, Samsung allegedly won’t stop there, as the South Korean outfit will also release other special variants of the Galaxy S7 and its curved-edge equal. They include one inspired by the 2016 Winter Olympics, while another will reportedly be done in collaboration with a popular South Korean singer.

Related: Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge rumors and news

Samsung has yet to confirm or deny the existence of any of these special-edition smartphones, let alone the Galaxy S7 and the Galaxy S7 Edge themselves. However, it wouldn’t be the first time Samsung ventured into the world of special-edition handsets, as the company released the Iron Man limited edition Galaxy S6 Edge last May.
If the three aforementioned limited editions are anything like the Iron Man smartphone, however, they will be pricey and they will be available in very limited quantities. Not only were there only 1,000 Iron Man Galaxy S6 Edge units made, but they were so expensive that one Amazon reviewer wrote he sold his genitalia, left foot, and wife on the black market just to get one. Grim stuff.

Regardless, this makes us wonder what the Batman v Superman Galaxy S7 Edge would even look like. Even though The Avengers: Age of Ultron contained multiple superheroes, Samsung and Marvel opted to go with Iron Man, so it will be interesting to see who Samsung and DC Comics roll with. Our money’s on Batman, since Samsung isn’t exactly known for releasing smartphones with outlandish colors, such as a Superman edition would require, but my personal pick is Wonder Woman, who also has a starring role in the movie.

Also watch: Samsung Galaxy S7 could get upstaged by 360-degree VR cam
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g reportedly looks to continue its release of limited edition smartphones by releasing a special edition Batman v. Superman Galaxy S7.

Source: Special Edition Batman v Superman Galaxy S7 Edge Coming? | Digital Trends

14- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
195 Views

AdWords Automated Bidding Gets An Overhaul: Welcome, Portfolio Bid Strategies

Terminology changes come with some new functionality, including the ability to set different CPA targets at the ad group level within the same bid strategy.

Google is going to be rolling out a revamp of AdWords automated bidding. Some of the changes are just semantic, but the workflow is also getting an update.

First the naming changes:

  1. Flexible strategies will be called “portfolio” bid strategies. The change is meant to better indicate that a single strategy can be applied across multiple campaigns, ad groups — and keywords, in some cases.
  2. A strategy that is applied to a single campaign is called a “standard” bid strategy.
  3. Conversion Optimizer will be called Target CPA for all new bid strategies to simplify the nomenclature. Target CPA can still be applied as a “standard” or a “portfolio” bid strategy.

Now for the functionality updates:

  1. Managers will be able to create or add to bidding strategies from the Campaigns Setting tab — no more need to dive into the Shared Library.
  2. Portfolio bid strategies for Target CPA can have different CPA goals for separate ad groups. “For example, if you’re a clothing retailer with multiple ‘Accessories’ ad groups in a bidding portfolio, you may want to set a lower CPA target for ‘Socks’ compared to other product categories with higher average order value.”

Adwords target CPA bid strategy

Note that Portfolio bid strategies can not be applied to video or universal app campaigns

.The periodic Table of SEO success factors

In December, Google added new reporting features for automated bidding. These latest updates will start showing up in accounts over the next few weeks.Google Adwords

Source: AdWords Automated Bidding Gets An Overhaul: Welcome, Portfolio Bid Strategies

13- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
307 Views

SEO Doesn’t Have To Be A Shot In The Dark | TechCrunch

 To many startups, search engine optimization (SEO) is a task that sits on their company’s back burner.  Yes, there’s an element of uncertainty with SEO (after all, Google doesn’t publicly reveal the factors they use to rank websites). But according to a new ranking-factor study, SEO doesn’t have to be a shot in the dark. In fact, you can prioritize your SEO tasks based on what’s likely to give you the most bang for your buck.

With features to launch and customers to support, the idea of spending time fiddling with your title tags can seem like a fool’s errand. That’s especially true when there’s no guarantee that your hard work will result in a single additional visitor from Google. That’s one of the reasons that a recent study ranked SEO as the third most important marketing priority for startups (behind social media and content marketing).

Why do startups tend to shy away from SEO? From working with dozens of startups, I’ve found that founders hate the uncertainty that comes from SEO. Indeed, success with SEO can seem like throwing two dice and hoping you roll double sevens.

 

Backlinks, content and page speed are key 

Backlinko recently teamed up with a handful of SEO software companies to evaluate the factors that are most important for success with SEO today. To do this, they analyzed one million Google search results.

Of the 20 potential ranking factors they looked at, five were revealed to be especially important. I’m going to deep-dive into these five important ranking factors, and show you how you can apply them to squeeze more juice out of your SEO efforts.

Content is king?

The study found that the most important ranking factor was number of different websites linking to your page.

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This ranking factor is as old as Google itself.

Despite the fact that so-called “black hat SEOs” manipulate Google with phony links, it appears that this ranking factor remains an integral part of what makes Google tick.

This shouldn’t come as a big surprise. Google’s reliance on backlinks has taken it from two guys in a garage near Stanford to one of the most valuable companies on the planet. And today, Google’s worldwide search market share remains relatively stable. This makes it unlikely Google will completely remove backlinks from their algorithm. This data suggests that, at least for today, backlinks are still heavily relied upon by Big G.

You can prioritize your SEO tasks based on what’s likely to give you the most bang for your buck.

Another interesting wrinkle is that this finding flies in the face of what many SEO consultants recommend: Many SEO agencies preach a “quality over quantity” approach to link building.

While there’s no question certain backlinks provide more benefit than others (for example, a link from TechCrunch is significantly more powerful than a link from your average mommy blog), this study suggests that backlink quantity is also important.

This is an important lesson for founders and startup marketers to learn. As someone who does PR consulting for startups, I notice that many founders shoot for the moon with their link and PR aspirations. In other words, to many founders, it’s “CNN.com or bust.” This new data suggests that this approach may be a mistake. In fact, one of the chief reasons I took Polar to 40+ million pageviews is that I wasn’t overly picky about which sites we got mentions and links from.

If a site looked legit and wanted to cover us, I said, “Let’s do it.” That’s part of the reason I’ve landed 1,300 mentions over the last few years.

As you can see, a  lot of these mentions were on major news sites. But the funny thing is that a good chunk of these major mentions came as a result of a smaller blog or niche news site writing about us. In fact, this is the exact strategy that Ryan Holiday recommends in his PR classic “Trust Me, I’m Lying.”

Not only are mentions from smaller sites beneficial for startups’ PR, but they can significantly boost your Google rankings, as well.

Slow loading site = SEO death

Backlinko’s new study also found a strong tie between site speed and Google rankings. Using site-loading-speed data from Alexa, they discovered that fast-loading websites significantly outperformed slow sites.

This finding shouldn’t come as a shock to anyone who follows SEO. Google has come out and said they use site speed as a “signal in our search ranking algorithms.” Because users hate slow-loading websites, Google doesn’t want to show them to their users.

Fortunately, taking your site from “tortoise” to “hare” is relatively simple. If you happen to use WordPress, there are no shortage of plug-ins that can boost your site’s loading time. Even if you don’t use WordPress, a few quick steps can typically move the needle for most websites:

  • Upgrade your hosting: Cheap $5/month hosting plans like Bluehost aren’t bad, but their servers aren’t typically optimized for speed.
  • Cut image file sizes: For most websites, images are the No. 1 factor that slow down a page. You can usually compress them or reduce their size without sacrificing much in the way of quality.
  • Hire a coder: If you’re not a coder, hiring a pro to analyze your code with an eye on site speed can be a game changer. Most sites have at least some code bloat that can be easily cleaned up.

Long-form content wins the day

Backlinko also found that, when it comes to SEO, content may not be king, but it’s certainly queen. Specifically, their data revealed that long-form content tended to rank above shorter content.

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According to their analysis, the average article on Google’s first page boasts 1,890 words.

Does this mean that Google has an inherent preference for long content? Maybe. The study authors pointed out that this finding was simply a correlation, and they couldn’t say for sure. But they hypothesized that Google would want to show their users through content that fully answers their query. In other words, long-form content.

However, it may be that longer content generates more shares (in the form of tweets, Facebook likes and backlinks). In fact, BuzzSumo found that longer content tended to generate more social shares.

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Considering that shares can lead to higher rankings, long-form content may simply outperform short content in the share department, leading to higher Google rankings.

If you haven’t attempted to publish long-form content because you feel your audience doesn’t have the attention span for it, this finding may give you the impetus to at least give it a shot.

Adding focus to your content may improve rankings

Additionally, the study found that focused content outperformed content that attempted to cover several different topics. Using software called MarketMuse, each article in their database was scored for “topical authority.” A high score represents an article that covered a topic in-depth. A low score indicates that the article skimmed the surface of a given topic.

The authors guessed that Google would prefer comprehensive content. This is because of a fundamental shift in the way Google indexes content. In the last few years, Google has moved away from simply looking at the words on your page to actually understanding what your page is about. This is known as semantic search.

For example, before semantic search, if you Googled “who is the CEO of Starbucks”, Google would look for pages that contained the exact term “who is the CEO of Starbucks” on the page. And they would present 10 links to those pages.

Today, they know the actual answer, and present it to you.

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It turns out that Google may prefer in-depth content, as it gives them a deeper understanding of your content. This study found that content rated as having high topical authority ranked above content with a poor rating.

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The old writing adage “go an inch wide and a mile deep” may also now apply to SEO, as well.

Bounces aren’t just hurting conversions

This research also found a correlation between a low bounce rate and poor rankings in Google.

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According to the study, Google may use bounce rate as a proxy measure of content quality. If someone searches for a keyword, clicks on your page and quickly leaves, it sends a message to Google that your page isn’t a good fit for that keyword.

On the other hand, if you stay on the site and browse through several different pages, it implies that that person had a great experience and enjoyed reading your content. That may push Google to show your page to more people.

While this finding is interesting, there are a few important caveats I should point out.

Also, being a correlation study, it’s impossible to say whether Google directly measures or uses bounce rate as a ranking signal. A high bounce rate may simply reflect content that isn’t very good.

Regardless, reducing your bounce rate certainly won’t result in lower rankings — and it can boost conversions, as well.

Source: SEO Doesn’t Have To Be A Shot In The Dark | TechCrunch

09- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
424 Views

Super Bowl Ads drove 7.5 incremental searches for Advertisers

Google stated that 82% of TV ad-driven searches during the Super Bowl occurred on mobile devices. This year, the ads drove 7.5 million incremental searches during the game which was a 40 percent higher lift than last year.

The winning Super Bowl Ad of 2016? Audi, “Commander” won the top spot.  Four of the top five ads driving lift in brand search were from automotive manufacturers: Audi, Acura, Honda and Kia.