14- Aug2017
Posted By: DPadmin
200 Views

How to Show Up on the First Page of Google (Even if You’re a Nobody) | Neil Patel

first page

There’s a joke that asks, “Where should you bury something that you don’t want people to find?”

Answer: On the second page of Google.

Sure, it’s corny. But there’s still some truth to that statement.

75% of people will never scroll past the first page on a Google search.

That means you can’t afford to be ranking on the second, third, or fourth page.

You just won’t get the clicks and traffic you need to make SEO worth your time and money.

And you need that organic traffic because 93% of online experiences begin with a search engine.

On top of that, there are over 1 trillion searches every single month!

A good SEO presence has the power to drive inbound traffic that could grow your business for years to come.

But the average-joe website owner doesn’t have the power to rank on the first page of Google for the best keywords.

There are already countless high-profile websites capitalizing on the top industry keywords.

And there are thousands of other bloggers trying to rank for that keyword as well.

That means the deck is stacked. And it’s not in your favor.

You shouldn’t give up, though! There are a few proven methods that I’ve used and found success with to show up on the first page of Google.

And the best part is that you don’t need the authority or links to rank for many of these keywords.

I can teach you how to show up for them anyway.

First, I’ll explain why you’re doomed for now.

And second, I’ll show you how to use this problem to your advantage to rank on the first page of Google despite your shortcomings.

Ready to get started? Let’s do it.

Why you probably can’t rank on the first page of Google anytime soon

I’m going to be straight with you:

You’re pretty much doomed. If you’re trying to get noticed and rank organically on the first page for popular industry keywords like “SEO Guide,” it’s not going to happen anytime soon.

If you’re just starting out, you’ve got no domain authority, a tiny backlink profile, and hardly any traction as a result.

And if you take a look at Google’s first page results for “SEO Guide,” you’ll quickly see what the major problem you’re up against is:

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See what I mean? The domain authorities of these top page rankings are going to blow any new website out of the water.

Moz? 93 domain authority. Kissmetrics? 85.

How many backlinks does that #1 spot have? 18,389 to be exact.

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That’s more than most of us will get on our entire site. Ever.

Plus, these guides have been up for years!

The Beginner’s Guide to SEO from Moz has been up for five years or so. Their website claims that over three million people have read it.

You get the idea.

Sites that have been around for a long time are going to dominate the top page rankings for popular industry keywords.

These people are producing stellar content and getting countless backlinks to their content.

If you’re just starting out, you need to pursue different strategies.

You can’t afford to wait around for five years to rank on the bottom of the first page for “SEO Guide.” Not with the number of hours and dollars it would take.

But that’s OK!

Just realize that you’re not going to rank organically for it right now.

The good news is that you don’t need to. There’s still hope.

The trick is to readjust your strategy and use different methods to still show up for your target keywords.

Here’s how to do it.

1. Start by dominating long-tail keywords

There are more long-tail keywords out there than big, popular ones.

Here’s a simple comparison to explain the difference:

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And my own beautifully simple example:

  • ‘Head’ keyword = “SEO guide”
  • Long-tail =  “SEO guide for small businesses 2017”

Each might not send you a ton of traffic. However, long-tail keywords do in total when you add a bunch of them up.

For example, I was able to increase my organic traffic to 173,336 visitors monthly using a long-tail strategy.

Long-tail searches also make up the majority of searches on Google.

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You should target these long-tail keywords because they’re easier to rank for. And that means they’ll usually take less time and money.

So you’re not going up against the mammoth, industry-leading companies on these search engine result pages (SERPs).

Still skeptical of the power of long-tail strategies? I was, too, at first!But then I read about how Amazon makes 57% of their sales from long-tail keywords.

How? Because long-tail searches are looking for very specific information, whereas short-tail keywords are more general.

If you can give the searcher specific information, they’re going to stick around and convert.

Here’s an example SERP of a long-tail keyword search to help you get an idea of how it’s possible to rank for them.

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Do you notice that the SERP isn’t overcrowded with industry influencers and top blogs?

Sure, there are still a few in there, but the top-ranking sites are ones that you’ve probably never heard of.

Instead of going up against a website with a 93 domain authority, here’s what the first ranking page for this long-tail search query looks like:

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Now I’ve got your attention, right?

So sure, this keyword might have lower search volume than “SEO Guide.”

But remember that these long-tail keyword conversion rates are almost always higher.

And you know what I preach:

Traffic doesn’t mean anything if people don’t convert!If you’re getting 50,000 visitors a month from a popular keyword, but nobody is converting, it’s not doing you much good.

Instead of putting all your eggs in one basket for “SEO Guide,” create more content and optimize it for long-tail searches to dominate the SERPs!

Now let’s talk about a few ways to rank for the more popular terms that you just can’t seem to resist. And let’s do it without any ‘classic’ SEO.

2. Pay to reach the top of the AdWords search network

AdWords?

Now, you may be thinking, “Neil, my friend, my mentor, you do know that AdWords is not organic search, right?”

Well, just hear me out on this one, okay?

I’m going to start this one off with an example because it’s the only way to understand how truly effective this strategy can be.

So let’s fire up a search for “Best CRM.”

Here’s what the results page looks like:

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It looks a bit different, doesn’t it? There’s not a single organic result until you scroll past the fold.

You’ve got four AdWords search network ads and a featured snippet from a single organic result.

It takes the user multiple steps just to reach the organic results and decide what to click on this SERP.

But something even more important jumps out at me here.

The keyword intent and the results that appear don’t line up.

Here’s what I mean.

Check out the first three ads:

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They all talk about their own CRM and say that they’re the best in the industry.

That’s not surprising, necessarily. Everyone wants their products and services to be seen as the best.

But for this search, that’s a problem.

And more importantly, this is an opportunity for you to show up for that keyword.Here’s why.

What are people looking for when they type in “Best CRM?”

Are they looking for Salesforce or Zoho or Pipedrive right now?

No. They’re looking for a CRM comparison to see which one is the best. They want to consider their alternatives and options before deciding.

You can validate this by looking at the organic results, which all feature comparison articles and reviews.

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Google wants to help the searcher find what they’re looking for as fast as possible.

That means the top organic results usually reflect the searcher’s intent.

So instead of looking for a branded PPC ad about one product being the best, a searcher is looking for CRM comparisons!

Now, do you remember those top 3 PPC results? They’re probably not getting any clicks because they’re not answering the searcher’s question.

The content doesn’t match the intent behind the search query.

But look at the 4th result:

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If I were a betting man (which I am), I’d bet you that this low-domain-authority website is getting countless clicks for “Best CRM.”

I’d bet that this ad outperforms the ones above it.

This no-name site can rank with the big boys because they’ve done a better job matching keyword intent with their ad.

It’s practically cheating the system, and it works perfectly.

Now check out all of the traffic you have the opportunity to steal without competing for it head-on with massive brands in the organic rankings:

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Instead of preaching about their product, the fourth ad lines up their content to look exactly like the organic results.

However, they show up before the organic results with no effort spent on link building.

You don’t need to organically rank for a keyword to get traffic for that keyword. Just remember to match the searcher’s intent and mimic the organic results to drive traffic.

3. Write more blog posts than your competition

What’s the downside of a long-tail keyword strategy?

You can’t stuff a bunch of random keywords onto the same page. You should still focus on one or two keywords per post, max.

That means you’re going to have to create a lot more content!

This is no great secret.

If you write more content, you’ve got a better shot at ranking on the first page of Google.

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The more you write, the more pages get indexed, and the more traffic you bring to your site.

If you’re writing 5-10 posts a month, it’s still not enough.

Your competition and industry leaders are writing 16+ every single month.

You can’t reasonably expect to outrank a competitor or catch up to an industry leader by writing less, can you?

No way.

You need to write like your business depends on it. Because based on the information above, it does!

And it can’t be any old 500-word blog post that you slap together in an hour.

Here’s what the top content on Google looks like on average.

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Everything on the first page of Google is over 2,000 words.

That means that you need to write more in-depth content that guides users through the process of solving their problems.

This content should be actionable and filled with images, examples, and step-by-step instructions.

Now is about the time when you start thinking, “How on Earth am I going to carve out time to write more?”

If that’s the case, maybe you need to hire someone.

The good news is that content marketing costs 62% less than other marketing mediums. All while generating 3x the number of leads.

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If you want to start ranking for the top keywords, you need to produce valuable, unique content — and lots of it.

On top of that, you also need to optimize your content to generate the highest CTR possible.

Why? Because optimizing headlines and meta descriptions for searchers can result in a 10% increase in CTR.

And an increase in CTR means you’re on your way to ranking higher.

Here’s an example:

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Why do you think this Search Engine Land post outranks the post below it?

Take a look at that headline!

Instead of a basic headline, they make you think about what you just searched.

It goes against the grain of normal, acceptable advice. It’s like a pattern interruption that causes you to stop what you’re doing.

Now you’re rethinking everything you once thought was true!

Here are a few powerful headline templates to try immediately to boost your organic CTR:

[ ______________ ] Using These 5 Strategic Moves
10 Quick Moves to [ ________________ ] and Increase Revenue
How I Used These 5 Moves to [ ____________ ]

Interested in more headline tips to increase your CTR and boost your rankings? Start with my in-depth guide on headlines.

4. Get reviewed and featured in round-ups

Sometimes, spending money on PPC ads to rank higher for keywords isn’t an option.

Spending too much time and money on creating long-form guides to rank for your desired keywords also may not be feasible.

Luckily, you can still get your name featured in top-ranking content! All while doing a fraction of the work.

Rather than having your official site placed on the top page of Google from AdWords or organic rankings, you can get featured in round-up posts with minimal time and effort.

Here’s what I mean:

Just go to Google and search “best SEO tools 2017”:

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All the results are roundup-style posts in which the authors review and analyze the top tools.

It’s basically free advertising.

You can get your name out to thousands upon thousands of consumers a month who are clicking on those top-ranking posts.

For example, let’s click on the first result from PC Magazine:

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They cover each SEO tool, providing reviews of each feature the tools have and then helping to prioritize them for everyone else.

Now, you can use these roundup-style posts to your advantage. Rank well on these posts, and you’ll get tons of traffic in return.

For example, thousands of people are already searching for “SEO tools.”

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Then you can conduct outreach to have your tool featured in those comparisons.

And that traffic can be huge:

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If you’re featured on all of the comparison posts that already rank on the top page, you’re going to get traffic from each one of those.

And this traffic will already be primed to buy from you.

A few simple outreach efforts can now save you years of grinding away in obscurity to get your brand in front of eager searchers.

No time, no money, and just a little effort can still get your brand in the top results.

If the deck is stacked against you in one game, just switch the game that you’re playing.

Conclusion

Showing up on the first page of Google is nearly impossible if you’re just starting out.

That’s harsh, but it’s also true.

Industry leaders who’ve been producing content for years dominate all of the best keywords and SERPs.

Many of them have been spending millions on big-budget ad campaigns, too.

So you can’t expect to rank first when you’re new.

The competition is already so far out ahead. They’ve been accumulating thousands of links and countless shares while this business was still a twinkle in your eye.

Their brands are well-established, and their authority is too high.

But you still need organic traffic to thrive and keep your business growing.

Thankfully, there are a few workarounds.

Try researching and producing content for long-tail keywords. The volume might be lower, but so is the competition.

Use sneaky tactics like PPC ads to rank above the organic results for an extremely popular ‘head’ keyword that you know you’ll never be able to rank for organically.

Try getting reviewed in roundup-style posts to get featured on top articles.

There’s plenty of unconventional methods to get your brand in front of the traffic that you crave.

You just have to get a little creative and understand that you might not always rank for the top terms.

But other methods exist to get similar results if you know where to look.

What strategies have you used to rank on the first page of Google?

Source: How to Show Up on the First Page of Google (Even if You’re a Nobody)

07- Sep2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
1465 Views

7 quick SEO hacks for the SEO newbie

Want some simple SEO tips that will help move the needle without breaking the bank? Columnist Stephan Spencer has seven for you.

Perhaps you believe that you already found the easy stuff, the “low-hanging fruit,” as it were: good keywords for your niche, optimized titles and body copy, an XML sitemap. Nevertheless, you can’t seem to break past your competitors in the Google SERPs for your most coveted keywords.

You may not have the time or resources right now to do an expensive site overhaul or to even commit to SEO long-term. You may only want a few simple tweaks that will help move the needle.

Well, look no further. You are in luck, because you won’t need years of SEO training for the following hacks. And these hacks also won’t cost you a lot of time or money to implement. You won’t even need to change significant parts of your site. Intrigued? Then let’s continue.

1. Distribute your home page’s link authority to your most important pages

Your home page naturally attracts more links than any other page of your site. A crucial part of your SEO strategy should be ensuring that link authority gets effectively directed from your home page to your most important subpages. While Google can render JavaScript and AJAX better than ever, your safest bet is plain HTML links.

You’ve probably already ensured that your most important category pages are included in the top nav. But how about including links to your most important products (or the ones that you most want to rank) in the body of the home page? If you don’t have product pages, then feature things like articles and landing pages in the body. Links in the body of a page will typically pass more link authority than navigational links, especially footer links.

Creating clear, prominent links is useful from a user experience standpoint as well, because it ensures people can easily find your best stuff quickly.

2. Stop using such huge images

At least half of the sites I audit have issues with very large images on the home page. Often, designers or content creators don’t consider the file size or resolution of an image before adding it to a page. They won’t reduce an image to the maximum size needed on the page, nor will they save it at an appropriate resolution.

A 600 dpi image that was “resized” to be tiny using the width and height attributes in an IMG tag isn’t merely lazy, it’s an affront to website visitors. A huge image (I’ve seen single images as large as 6 MB on a home page) can substantially slow down the time it takes for the page to load, hurting both your rankings and the user experience (and consequently, the site’s conversion rate).

It is incredibly easy to optimize that image to a more reasonable size and then re-upload it. This is probably the number one “quick hack” for improving your site speed.

Use a tool like WebPageTest to check the file sizes of all the elements on a page. (Or you can use the Developer Tools built into the Chrome browser if you’re a geek like me.) Check your images, and have your designers optimize them. Train the people who create and upload your content to get into the habit of checking image sizes before they publish anything.

3. Check that people aren’t linking to pages that 404

Look for URLs that are returning a 404 on your site and have external links pointed at them. Google Search Console gives you the ability to check the 404 pages on your site and see whether they are being linked to (and from where). If you have a externally linked page which returns a 404, prioritize fixing it ASAP, as you are squandering link authority every minute that remains unfixed. Recovering that link equity and/or traffic is a very easy “quick win.”

To do this in Google Search Console, go to Crawl > Crawl Errors > Not Found and click on each URL returning a 404. Google will usually sort the errors by the most to least important and the most important include the ones with external links. After clicking on a URL, select the “Linked From” tab and it will show you the URLs linking to the page in question. Make sure these 404 URLs are 301 redirected to the next most relevant URL on your site.

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Google Search Console “Linked From” example

As you get more advanced at this type of link reclamation, you’ll probably also want to augment GSC with other link analysis tools, such as Link Research Tools’ Link Juice Recovery Tool andAhrefs’ Broken Links report. But we’ll save that for another time.

4. Leverage that microsite, article or video that’s not on your main site

Videos, articles and microsites can be a fantastic way to garner brand awareness and attention. However, if you’re hosting the content on others’ domains, then you may be wasting the SEO opportunity. Once the buzz has subsided, the content is hopefully left with great links. If those links are pointing somewhere other than to your main site, you’re not getting much SEO benefit.

Victoria’s Secret missed an opportunity when they got featured on the BuzzFeed front page for their article, “12 Things Women Do Every Day That Are Fearless,” because that article failed to link back to the victoriassecret.com website. Thus, all the inbound links solely benefited BuzzFeed. Unless brand awareness is your sole goal, at a minimum, you need a link to your site from the syndicated content.

The best option, however, from an SEO perspective, is to host that content on your own site. And even then, try to find ways to direct traffic and authority from that content to your most important landing pages and products.

5. Use forums and social hubs to uncover valuable keywords and topics before your competitors

Seize a valuable keyword even before your competitors take notice by monitoring conversations in social media and in forums within your niche. Notice a recurring mention or a recurring question? Find a way to work it into your site’s content or blog.

It will not only help you rank for that question or phrase, but it will also seat you in a position of authority by knowing the answers to the questions everyone has. Having that content first, before your competitors, can give you an advantage, not only in thought leadership, but in ranking and traffic as well.

Sometimes this will also uncover keywords that you wouldn’t imagine would relate to your product. For example, a baby furniture retailer could consider “baby names” as a valuable keyword to target, even though they have nothing to sell around that topic. If the topic is only tangentially related but is being searched on by your exact target market, consider including it in your content strategy.

6. Increase the visibility of your SERP listing with rich snippets

Which one of these would you rather click?

slackline set on Google Searchslackline kit on Google SearchSnippets are like putting a bow tie on a cute cat. Cute cats on their own are great, as are first-page listings. But put a bow tie on that kitty and you’ve got something that few can resist. Rich snippets are among my favorite SEO tactics. Coupled with a great, enticing meta description and title tag, they make your snippet stand out from the crowd. In this case, if you’re looking for the best slackline to give to your outdoorsy significant other, you are going to want to look for the listing that looks like it is an awesome product from a quality supplier.

Each rich snippet added to the SERP is an opportunity. The rating shows the searcher that this product is high-quality, as evidenced by pleased past buyers. The price and the “in stock” markers tell searchers what they need to know to invest in your quality product.

The extra product information and review stars naturally draw the user’s eye to your listing and increase your click-through rate. Rich snippets won’t increase your rankings, but for the rankings you already have, they will drive more visitors to your site.

7. Use link analysis tools to mine for your competitors’ best links

It’s common knowledge that authoritative links are critical to high Google rankings. Acquiring such links is where people get lost. One simple thing you can do is find hubs that link to multiple competitors. A hub is a site that links out to the major players within a niche. It could be a trade magazine, a review site, a blog or a forum. Identify such hubs with a tool like Majestic‘s “Clique Hunter” or SEOprofiler. Hubs are already linking to similar sites, so in all likelihood it won’t be a huge leap for them to link to you as well.

Search for the sites linking to your competitors, examine them to see which might link to you (Not all will make sense to approach), and reach out to them. This is probably the easiest link building you can do, as your competitors have already done the hard work of not only finding the sites, but also qualifying them as ones that will link to sites like yours.

Source: 7 quick SEO hacks for the SEO newbie

19- Feb2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
435 Views

App Store SEO: The Inbound Marketer’s Guide to Mobile – Moz

As the app ecosystem grows, many marketers are turning their sights towards mobile app marketing. Today’s post provides a high-level view of App Store Optimization, and gives tips on how to break into the rapidly expanding world of apps.

How to Optimize for App Store Search Engines

Let’s dive into search in the app stores, and how the search engines differ based on platform.

First things first; remember I mentioned that the app ecosystem reminds me of the web in the mid-to-late 90’s? Keep that picture in your head when you think of search. App store search hasn’t been “figured out” in the same way that Google “figured out” search on the web. Simply put, we’re still in AltaVista mode in the app ecosystem: something better than Yahoo’s directory provided, but not incredibly sophisticated like Google would become in a few more years.

Just like the web has on-page and off-page SEO, apps have on-metadata and off-metadata ASO. On-metadata ASO include factors totally within your control and are often things dealing with your app store presence. Off-metadata ASO include factors that might not be entirely in your control, but which you can still influence. Here are a few of the most important knobs and levers that you as a marketer can turn to affect your search performance, and some quick tips on how to optimize them.

On-Metadata

App Title

An app’s title is the single most important metadata factor for rank in ASO. It’s equivalent to the <title> tag in your HTML, and is a great signal to the app stores as to what your app is about. On the web, you want your title to include both a description of what you do (including keywords) as well as some branding; both elements should also exist in the app store. Be sure to include the keywords, but don’t be spammy. Make sure it parses well and makes sense. Example: “Strava Run – GPS Running, Training and Cycling Workout Tracker

Description

Patrick Haig, our VP of Customer Success, likes to break descriptions down into two sections: above the fold and below the fold (sound familiar?). He says, “Above the fold language should be 1-2 sentences describing the app and its primary use case, and below the fold should have a clear and engaging feature set and social proof.” We’ll dig into some of the differences about the description field across platforms below.

Keyword Field

The Keyword Field in iOS is a 100 character field which you can use to tell iTunes search for which keywords you should show up. Since you only get 100 characters, you must use them wisely. A few tips:

  • When choosing your keywords, just like on the web, focus on relevancy, search volume, and difficulty.
  • Don’t use multiple word phrases; break out to individual words (Apple can combine them for you).
  • Don’t repeat keywords that are already in your title (and put the most important ones in your title, leaving the keyword field for your secondary keywords).
  • Separate keywords with commas, and don’t use spaces anywhere.

Icon

Consumers are finicky. They want apps which are beautiful, elegant, and simple to understand. Your icon is often their first interaction with your app, so ensure that it does a great job conveying your brand, and the elegance and usefulness of your app. Remember, in search results, an icon is one of the only ways you can convey your brand and usefulness. Think of it as part of the meta description tag you’d create in SEO. For example, SoundCloud does a great job with their icon and branding.

Screenshots

The most important rule to remember when creating your screenshots is that they should not be screenshots. They are, instead, promotional graphics. That means you can include text or other graphics to tell your app’s story in an interesting, visual way.

Especially in iOS, where the card layout shows your first screenshot, it is incredibly helpful when an app displays a graphic which explains the app right up front, increasing conversions from search results to viewing the app page and, ultimately, installing the app.

The best app marketers also use their screenshots promotional graphics together to create a flow that carries the user through the story. Each graphic can build off the previous graphic, giving the user a reason to continue scrolling and learning about your app.

Here’s a great example of using the screenshots effectively by our friends at Haiku Deck.

As the app ecosystem grows, many marketers are turning their sights towards mobile app marketing.

Off-Metadata

Outside of your direct control, you’ll also want to focus on a few things to ensure the best performance in ASO.

Ratings

Average Ratings

Every app has a rating. Your job as a marketer is to ensure that your app gets a great overall rating. Rating is directly tied to performance in app store search, which leads us to believe that rating is a factor in app store search rankings.

Reviews

Similar to ratings, you want to ensure that the reviews your users write about your app are positive. These reviews will help increase your conversion rate from app page views to downloads.

For a great product to help you increase your rating and reviews, check out Apptentive.

Link-building

This is discussed further below, but suffice it to say, link building to your app’s page in the app store matters for Google Play apps. Given you all are SEOs, you know all about how to rock this!

How Do iOS and Google Play Differ In App Store Search?

The differences in the platforms mean that there are different levers to pull depending on the platform. Google Play and iOS act completely independently, and often, quite differently. The differences are wide-ranging, but what are a couple of the main differences?

In general, the way to think about the differences is that Google is Google and Apple is Apple. Duh, right? Google has the built the infrastructure and technology to learn from the web and use many different data points to make a decision. Apple, on the other hand, doesn’t have indexes of the web, and comes from a background in media. When in doubt, imagine what you’d do if you were each of them and had the history each of them has.

Here are a couple concrete examples.

Description versus Keywords

In iOS, there’s a keywords field. It’s easy to see where this came from, especially when you think of iTunes’ background in music: a song has a title (app title), musician (developer name), and then needs a few keywords to describe the song (“motown,” “reggae,” etc.). When Apple launched their app store, they used the same technology that was already built for music, which meant that the app title, developer name, and keywords were the only fields used to understand search for an app. Note that description isn’t taken into account in iOS (but I expect this to change soon).

On the other hand, there is no keyword field in Google Play; there is only a description field. Thus, while iOS doesn’t take the description into account, in Google Play the description is all you have, so be sure to do exactly the same as you do on the web: cater your content towards your keywords, without being spammy.

Leveraging PageRank in Google Play

Another big difference in iOS and Google Play is that Google has access to PageRank and the link graph of the web, while Apple does not. Thus, Google will take into account the inbound links to your app’s detail page (for example, https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.symantec.mobilesecurity) as a factor in Google Play search, while Apple has no such factor.


How To Measure Success In App Marketing

It’s very difficult to measure success in app marketing in the same way you can measure success in web marketing. This is especially true when you’re working with inbound channels. It’s still early, but it’s continuously getting better, with more tools and services coming out all the time to help marketers understand success. Here are some of the ways I recommend measuring success in the app store today:

Search Rankings

Just like on the web, a great way to measure your success in app store search is to track your ranking for specific search terms you care about over time and versus your competition. Rank tracking is incredibly valuable for ASOs to understand their progress.

Top Charts

Top Charts, especially Top Charts within a particular category, do a great job of allowing you to understand your success in relation to the rest of the apps in your category.

As the app ecosystem grows, many marketers are turning their sights towards mobile app marketing.

Ratings and Reviews

Just as ratings and reviews will help your ASO, they are also great metrics to track over time for how you’re doing with your app marketing. Keep track of what users are saying, how they’re saying it (pro tip: listening to their language is a great way to do keyword research!), and what they’re rating your app.

Downloads

Taking it one step further, correlating your search rankings to downloads will allow you to understand the effect your increased ASO is having on your app performance. One way we do this is to integrate with iTunes Connect and overlay your search rankings with your downloads so you can visually see how closely related any one keyword is with your downloads. It’s not perfect, but it helps!

Conversion and Revenue

At the end of the day, revenue is the most important metric you should be understanding. Of course, you should be tracking your revenue and doing the same correlation with search performance. In addition, you should watch your conversion rate over time; we often see apps whose conversion rate soars with an increase in ASO because the users are so much more engaged with the app.


Tools And Resources To Use To Help With App Marketing

To conclude this post, I want to quickly talk about some tools and resources to use to help your app marketing process.

Sylvain has written some great content and has some incredible insights into app marketing and ASO on his company’s (Apptamin) blog.

I mentioned Apptentive above, and they really are the best way I know to impact your ratings and reviews, and get great feedback from customers in the process.

In addition to having a great, free, in-app analytics product (Flurry Analytics), as well as an interesting paid advertising product (AppCircle), Flurry also posts some of the most interesting data about the app ecosystem on their blog.

If you’re looking to obtain some amount of attribution for your paid advertising (inbound can’t be split out, sorry!), MobileAppTracking is where it’s at. It allows you to understand which paid channels are performing best for you based on the metric of your choosing. Best of all, you only pay for what you use.

App Marketing Tools

This is, of course, a shameless promotion. That said, our product is a great way to understand your performance in app store search, help you do keyword research, and give you competitive intelligence. We offer a free (forever!) tool for Indie developers and scale all the way up to the largest Enterprise customers.


Now It’s Your Turn–> Visit the link below to get the full list to help guide you along your optimization way!

Source: App Store SEO: The Inbound Marketer’s Guide to Mobile – Moz