12- Apr2018
Posted By: DPadmin
25 Views

3 Critical PPC Tasks You Should Do Every Day

Pay-per-click (PPC) advertising remains an effective way to grab the attention of your target audience and drive them back to your site so they can engage with your products and services.

Obviously, the higher your ads appear to the top, the more likely that someone will click on that ad.

That said, just getting the click isn’t the goal.

Getting a click that results in a sale, phone call, or lead is the goal.

In order to ensure the best opportunity for success, it is incredibly important to establish some sort of regular daily cadence or task list for your PPC campaigns.

While the rise in AdWords automation is helping with some, here are three PPC tasks that you should be doing every day to ensure nothing in the account is broken.

Daily Checklist Detail

1. Check Your Key Performance Indicators

Key performance indicators (KPIs) are an important metric to help marketers determine the effectiveness of many different kinds of campaigns.

When you decide to invest in PPC, you need some way of measuring the performance of your ads, or you’re just throwing away money without knowing whether your campaign is working.

The types of KPIs that you choose to prioritize will depend on your marketing goals.

Some of the most common types of KPIs for PPC campaigns include:

  • Number of clicks: This KPI tells you how many people actually clicked on your ad, which gives you a good idea if your ad is grabbing people’s attention. Clicks won’t always give you a full picture of how well your ads are doing, but they are an important piece of the puzzle.
  • Click-through rate: This KPI is calculated by dividing the number of clicks by the total number of impressions (views). There are different sweet spots for click-through-rates based on your industry.
  • Cost per click: This measures the amount of money you’re spending on your ad campaign based on how many people click on that ad. It is calculated by dividing the total amount you paid for a campaign by the number of times someone clicked on the ad. It’s a good way for you to determine whether your budget for that campaign was too high, too low, or just about right. A good rule of thumb is to check in on your brand CPCs. If you see a spike there, it can negatively affect performance.
  • Conversion rate: This measures the number of conversions that were directly generated by your ads. It is calculated by dividing the number of conversions by the total number of clicks.

These are just a few KPIs that are important in a PPC campaign.

Checking through these numbers on a daily basis can help you see if there are any outliers like a sudden surge of clicks or higher conversion rates on a particular day.

2. Review Your Negative Keyword List

One of the best ways to attract more clicks is to make sure that the language of your ads optimizes the most appropriate keywords for a search.

But when you’re running a PPC campaign, it’s equally important that you create and monitor your negative keyword list.

If you fail to include a negative keyword list on their campaigns, it can seriously dent the ROI for your ads.

For those who are new to the PPC game, here’s a quick primer that will help you understand a negative keyword.

Let’s say you’re selling shoes online.

You will want to include keyword variations that include gender, intent-based queries (e.g., “buy” and “on sale”) and qualifiers (e.g., “running”).

But what if you wanted to exclude higher-volume, lower converting terms (e.g., “womens shoes”).

In the below example, you can see how excluding terms based on match type will impact your ability to target specific types of keywords:

Negative Keywords Samples

By creating a list of negative keywords, you’re telling search engines that these are not relevant words for your business and that your ads shouldn’t show up when people conduct searches using those words.

You should review your negative keyword list daily because search behavior changes regularly.

Make sure your list is updated to avoid spending money on ads that show up in front of people who aren’t part of your target audience.

There are two quick ways to find potential negative keywords:.

Popular Search Terms

Popular Searches

The new ‘Searches’ card in Google AdWords will highlight the most popular words and phrases driving traffic to your site.

Click the Words tab for an even more granular look.

In this example, we discovered two potential negatives to include in the campaign:

Words Card

Knowing which keywords a majority of searchers are using to find your website can help you both add valuable new keywords, and create lists of negative keywords you discover to be irrelevant.

Search Query Reports

Google’s Search Query Reports will give you the most comprehensive way to check for negative keywords that you may need to add to your list.

While getting this granular may not be a daily task, if you see some warning signs (like those in the previous example) a dive into your search query report from the previous day may be warranted.

3. Review Your Daily Budget

Your AdWords average daily budget is not fixed, which means that as you review your campaigns daily, you can change that budget based on analyzing some key KPIs.

Combine that with Google’s daily budget change that increased daily budgets by 2x and you have a good reason to monitor this daily.

The most common application of budget management involves shifting across days of the week.

For example, if you notice that your ads are generating more traffic on a Wednesday, but are dead on a Monday, you may want to shift some of your budget to take advantage of what’s happening on Monday to maximize your ROI.

Ad Delivery Method

Delivery Method

Reviewing your budget can also help you determine whether you need to change your ad delivery method.

AdWords has two types of delivery method:

  • Accelerated delivery: This shows your ads earlier in the day and typically chew up your daily budget before noon. You can only choose accelerated delivery if you’re using AdWords’ automated bidding.
  • Standard delivery: This displays your ads more evenly during the day. If you choose manual bidding, your campaigns automatically default to standard delivery.

Device Type

Budget by Device

Another quick check-in on your daily budget spending is how your budget is being spent across devices.

With the explosion of mobile, if not kept in check, the percentage of mobile spend compared to conversion can become skewed – essentially stealing your opportunities for desktop conversions.

Similar to the Popular Search Terms card, Google also has a “Device Type” card that will show differences across devices for clicks, impressions, and conversions.

Visually, this is a no-brainer to add to your daily budget checks.

Adaptation Is the Key to PPC Campaigns

When you launch a PPC campaign, one of the keys to success is making sure that you stay on top of KPIs, keywords and budget so that you can quickly determine if something is awry, and change how you’re approaching things.

The whole idea of PPC is to generate more quality visitors so they can turn into customers, but if you’re not performing daily reviews of your campaigns, a small problem can quickly snowball into a crisis.

Source: 3 Critical PPC Tasks You Should Do Every Day

12- Sep2017
Posted By: DPadmin
120 Views

The Four Most Popular Myths About Paid Advertising: Debunked

Is paying for AdWords worth it? Well, yes and no.

To someone unfamiliar with pay-per-click (PPC), opening the Google AdWords dashboard might look like a seven-headed monster that no entrepreneur can slay. I saw this time and time again during my time at Google. It’s a big reason why my co-founder and I decided to start AdHawk in the first place.

AdWords is complicated and can be overwhelming, which means there is a lot of misinformation floating out there and plenty of myths that call for some debunking.

We at Adhawk have had thousands of conversations with clients and potential clients about these myths, so I’m going to put the most common ones to rest today. Let’s get debunkin’.

Myth No. 1: The top ad position is always the best.

It’s automatically assumed that the first results are going to give you the most return for your money, but that’s not necessarily true.

study by Hallam Digital found that while the top position drove the most clicks, the second and third positions drove three to four times more conversions, respectively. They conclude that providing useful information, optimizing your landing page, adding extensions, using relevant copy and improving your overall quality score should always be a higher priority than anything else.

They further suggest that the second and third results receive more high-quality clicks because the first position draws in a mass audience, many of whom are not qualified to drive that coveted conversion.

If your ad is not in the first position and you’re still driving conversions, budgeting correctly and turning a profit, then so be it. This brings me to the next myth.

Myth No. 2: Every business needs to double down on PPC advertising.

PPC is more effective for some businesses more than others, but what it really boils down to is budgeting. Brett Farmiloebreaks it down into these three easy formulas:

  • (Revenue / Sales Period) / Average Sale = Number of Customers
  • Number of Customers / Conversion Rate = Number of Leads
  • Number of Leads / Conversion Rate on Traffic = Amount of Traffic

What this means is that if the price to acquire a customer is greater than the customer’s lifetime value, PPC is not worth it for you.

This might be the case for low-traffic and high-competition industries, where PPC advertising may cut margins and not scale.

Myth No. 3: You don’t need PPC if you have high-ranking organic content.

Organic strategies like SEO, social and email go hand in hand with PPC strategies. If you have the bandwidth and resources to execute, do all of them.

Building organic traffic is a great strategy that will pay off in the long run. That being said, managing and updating your SEO efforts after every Google algorithm update can start to feel like a never-ending game of whack-a-mole. The advantage of PPC advertising is how quickly it can be spun up to scale your business, and the relative stability it brings to the table.

The numbers speak for themselves. Paid search results drive 1.5 times more clicks than organic traffic, primarily because paid spots drive traffic to customized landing pages. Organic content is a great way to generate an audience, but if you want a predictable and direct method of acquiring customers or driving conversions, PPC is the way to go.

If you already have high-ranking content, you can double-rank on Google by creating paid ads for the same keywords your organic content ranks for. That’s double the real estate and double the chances for conversions.

Forbes Agency Council is an invitation-only community for executives in successful public relations, media strategy, creative and advertising agencies. Do I qualify?

Myth No. 4: Google is far superior to Bing.

For the record, no search engine is going to beat out Google in the near future. But Bing is in second place in terms of market share and it’s starting to gain significant traction.

Bing has its shortcomings (like less-advanced ad options), but it provides options that Google doesn’t, like being able to share budgets among all your campaigns.

Bing’s future is entertained by the fact that more than 50% of all search queries are now done through mobile. With Bing powering AOL, Yahoo, Amazon and Siri, things are looking bright.

This means Bing has a different user base than Google, which can provide a profitable opportunity to reach a new audience. For Search Engine Watch, driving conversions on Bing proved to be 63.23% cheaper than on Google.

The next time you hear one of these myths, share your newfound myth-busting knowledge with a friend, or tweet at me @AdHawk.

Source: The Four Most Popular Myths About Paid Advertising: Debunked

10- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
217 Views

How To Determine The Right PPC Advertising Budget

One of the top questions I hear from clients and prospects is, “How much should our budget be for pay-per-click advertising?”

The answer to identifying the appropriate PPC advertising budget depends on projections, assumptions and math. In this article, I’ll dive into a few of the formulas we use to help companies determine how much to spend on online advertising.

Lead Generation Formula

The core purpose of running paid ads is to achieve a business objective. We use a lead generation equation to help us reach that objective. The equations are simple:

(Revenue / Sales Period) / Average Sale = Number of Customers

Number of Customers / Conversion Rate = Number of Leads

Number of Leads / Conversion Rate on Traffic = Amount of Traffic

Let’s fill in these equations with some real numbers. Let’s say there is a revenue goal of $1 million. There are 12 sales periods per year (recurring monthly revenue) and the average sale per customer is $1,000.

($1 million / 12) / $1,000 = 83.33 customers

To get to $1 million in revenue, you’ll need about 84 customers. Now, let’s assume your sales team closes one out of every five leads, or 20%.

83.33 customers / 20% = 416.66 leads

Assuming a 20% close rate, you’ll need about 417 leads per year. Let’s assume 5% of your paid advertising traffic actually fills out a contact form to qualify as a lead.

416.66 leads / 5% conversion rate = 8,333.33 visits

With a 5% contact form conversion rate, you’ll need about 8,334 website visits to generate 417 leads, which will translate into 84 customers, which will equate to $1 million in revenue.

Of course, that’s if the numbers work out, which leads us to the next step in determining an advertising budget.

Existing Marketing Strategy

Paid advertising is only necessary if other marketing tactics fall short of achieving your revenue objective. Essentially, paid ads can help make up for the shortcomings of search engine optimization, email marketing, social media marketing and other forms of marketing meant to drive leads for your business.

Which marketing assets are currently driving results?

Taking into account how SEO, email, social and other marketing tactics are performing provides a more holistic marketing strategy. For example, if the strategies for SEO, email and social get you to 75% of your revenue objectives, then you’ll know paid advertising needs to account for the remaining 25%. Instead of driving $1 million in revenue, paid advertising can focus on driving $250,000 of revenue.

Competitor Analysis

What are your competitors spending on paid ads? What are their targeted keywords?

You can spy on your competitor’s paid advertising activity by using a service like SpyFu or SEMRush. Simply plug in your competitor’s website URL and these services will estimate their Google AdWords activity – including their estimated monthly spend, targeted keywords and ads.

The key here is to analyze at least five competitors to get a good baseline for the average spend in your industry. Make a list of three known competitors. Then, include two competitors who are bidding on your target keyword.

Let’s say competitor one is spending $3,000 per month, competitor two is spending $4,500, competitor three spends $0, competitor four spends $10,000, and competitor five spends $2,000.

Typically we’ll throw out the high and low to average out the remaining three competitors and get a ballpark estimate of what a company should roughly spend on Google AdWords to be competitive in their respective industry. In the example above, averaging out competitor spend estimates a monthly budget of $3,166 would be enough to be competitive.

But would it really, given your business objectives of $1 million in revenue? Let’s do some keyword research to see if search volumes will achieve your revenue results.

Source: How To Determine The Right PPC Advertising Budget