08- Nov2017
Posted By: DPadmin
125 Views

B2B SEO Requires an Integrated Approach 

Complex products and long buying cycles make search engine optimization for B2B sites different than for B2C.

The difference, however, is not in the specific techniques, but in the way SEO and other marketing tactics are integrated to help a B2B ecommerce company perform well in search engines. For B2C, SEO can perform as a standalone channel. But for B2B it is part of several marketing tactics working together.

“If you look at the SEO side of this, the fundamentals are all just exactly the same” as those for business-to-consumer SEO, said Jon Quinton, CEO of Overdrive Digital, a marketing firm, during a November 2016 SEMrush webinar.

“You have to have a site that is technically sound. You have to be relevant to the search queries that people are putting in. You have to have a certain degree of popularity and authority in order to rank, but … the approach [for B2B] …. is very different and often needs to be very different.”

Complex Products

Even seemingly mundane products can be relatively more complex to find, choose, and manage in the B2B channel.

For example, imagine a brick-and-mortar cowboy boot retailer with 20 stores in the Western United States. The company wants to order custom shopping bags for its stores, but it cannot just go out and order the first bags it finds.

The retailer will need to select finishes like matte, gloss, foil, or laminate; choose printing techniques; and even decide whether the extra $432 in setup fees each time it orders is worth it for two-sided printing.

It will also be important to know the supplier’s lead times are and how much the bags will cost.

This level of complexity can make it difficult to simply search for shopping bags on Google and find a good source in even the top 20 or more results.

Consensus Required

The B2B purchase process may require a consensus of several individuals.

Let’s continue with the example of a cowboy boot retailer looking online for custom printed shopping bags.

Unless the retail business is very small, it is likely that at least four individuals or groups will be involved in the buying decision.

First, there will be a person tasked with the initial research. This person may work in the purchasing department or even the marketing department and probably has a title like “assistant,” “specialist,” or “coordinator.”

Next, there will likely be a graphic designer who will want input on bag color, material, logo options, and graphic layout.

A brand manager, art director, or marketing director will need to approve everything the graphic designer selected, and someone from the operations group will weigh in on whether or not the bags are feasible. Will they hold large boot boxes? Do they fit under the counters?

Along the way, each of these folks will presumably go to Google or Bing and search for shopping bags. None of them will use the same exact keyword phrase.

Longer Buying Cycle

Given the complexity of options and the number of folks involved, don’t be surprised if it takes weeks for a B2B buyer to actually make a purchase, even when she is just buying shopping bags.

To be fair, this shopping bag example is hypothetical. Some B2B ecommerce purchases will be fast and easy. But others might be even more complex than shopping bags.

These complex purchases are going to require more work than simply attracting someone’s attention for a single query or a couple of keywords. What’s more, some B2B searches are dominated by third parties.

Integrated Approach

“There was a time when ranking number one for a keyword was a victory wholly worth pursuing — a time when you could build a list of keywords, craft 300-word blog posts, and your site would drive new business. That is no longer the case,” wrote Directive Consulting CEO, Garrett Mehrguth.

“In 2017, we have a different search engine, and it’s critically important that B2B companies understand this….If your B2B SEO strategy is based around ranking your own website instead of positioning your brand, you’re missing the bigger picture. The reality is that your own website is no longer the best answer in Google’s mind for the keywords that are lowest in the funnel. Google favors independent websites that allow visitors to compare and review their options (you can thank Yelp for this).”

Thus B2B ecommerce SEO may work best when it is integrated with the disciplines of search engine advertising, public relations, and content marketing. The goal is not to simply rank for a single keyword or even a group of keywords, but to surround those keywords with your brand.

This can take a few forms.

Search engine advertising. Purchase pay-per-click ads for the keywords your B2B ecommerce business is targeting for organic SEO. If you win the organic ranking, great. If not, you can still show the assistant, graphic designer, brand manager, and operations manager your products — no matter where they happen to be in the buying cycle. Also, use retargeting to follow B2B buyers.

Notice in this screen capture from Google for search results for "custom shopping bags" that some of the companies are buying multiple pay-per-click ads on the page.

Notice in this screen capture from Google for search results for “custom shopping bags” that some of the companies are buying multiple pay-per-click ads on the page.

Encourage reviews. Public relations and influencer marketing may help your B2B products earn reviews on popular sites. A third-party article describing how your custom shopping bags improved customer loyalty may appear much higher in search results than your own content and can still contribute to your sales.

Develop content for the entire buying process. Create useful articles and videos to address questions your prospects will have at each phrase of the buying cycle. This means helping the assistant who does the initial research organize options, helping the graphic designer, and even providing information for the folks in operations.

Ultimately, B2B ecommerce SEO may work best when you supplement your organic keywords with ads, influencers, and content.

Source: B2B SEO Requires an Integrated Approach | Practical Ecommerce

14- Aug2017
Posted By: DPadmin
123 Views

3 reasons pay-per-click matters for your business

PPC can be an incredibly cost-effective way to generate leads through search engines. The key is to look at the right metrics for the right situations and use that data to make the most meaningful changes to your campaigns.

There’s one thing nearly every potential B2B buyer does before buying a product or signing a contract for your services: search.

In fact, 77 percent of B2B buyers are said to research on Google before making a buying decision.

And while improving your organic search engine ranking is important, executing an search engine optimization plan takes time. It’s a long-game approach that pays long-term dividends.

For many businesses, pay-per-click (PPC) advertising through services like Google Adwords has become an incredibly effective way to leverage the keywords potential customers are using to search for your business or industry.

Here are a few reasons why PPC might be an incredibly valuable marketing tactic to increase traffic to your website and generate new leads.

1. You don’t have to wait to start generating leads

Because you’re paying for them, PPC allows you to get up and running with ads for the keywords you want to rank for pretty quickly. While an organic SEO strategy takes time, PPC allows you to get in the game for important industry keywords.

2. You only pay for what you convert

With PPC campaigns, you only pay for the clicks you generate. This means you’re only paying for the people who actually click through on the ad and visit the landing page you intended them to visit.

3. You can easily track conversions to measure ROI

By adding conversion pixels to your landing pages, PPC allows you to identify the exact cost-per-lead of your campaign, which can be a lot more arduous to generate with other marketing tactics. As a result, you’re able to continually tweak and optimize your ads to decrease the cost-per-lead.

How to measure PPC success

The truth is there are dozens of PPC metrics you can track. So, which ones matter most when it comes to reaching your business goals?

Rather than focusing solely on PPC analytics like clicks, impressions and click-through rates, here are some metrics that allow you to analyze macro metrics that speak to the ROI of your efforts:

  • Cost-per-conversion. This helps you determine if the PPC clicks you’re generating represent quality traffic that’s actually converting into sales.
  • Most valuable keywords. Being able to track which keywords lead to sales can help you zero in on where to give credit within your PPC campaigns.
  • Lifetime value of PPC customers. Once you have an understanding of how much it costs to convert a PPC lead, compare that to the other cost-per-customer marketing tactics against the lifetime value of your customers.

At the end of the day, PPC can be an incredibly cost-effective way to generate leads through search engines. The key is to look at the right metrics for the right situations and use that data to make the most meaningful changes to your campaigns.

Source: 3 reasons pay-per-click matters for your business – The Business Journals

11- Aug2017
Posted By: DPadmin
200 Views

3 reasons pay-per-click matters for your business

PPC can be an incredibly cost-effective way to generate leads through search engines. The key is to look at the right metrics for the right situations and use that data to make the most meaningful changes to your campaigns.

There’s one thing nearly every potential B2B buyer does before buying a product or signing a contract for your services: search.

In fact, 77 percent of B2B buyers are said to research on Google before making a buying decision.

And while improving your organic search engine ranking is important, executing an search engine optimization plan takes time. It’s a long-game approach that pays long-term dividends.

For many businesses, pay-per-click (PPC) advertising through services like Google Adwords has become an incredibly effective way to leverage the keywords potential customers are using to search for your business or industry.

Here are a few reasons why PPC might be an incredibly valuable marketing tactic to increase traffic to your website and generate new leads.

1. You don’t have to wait to start generating leads

Because you’re paying for them, PPC allows you to get up and running with ads for the keywords you want to rank for pretty quickly. While an organic SEO strategy takes time, PPC allows you to get in the game for important industry keywords.

2. You only pay for what you convert

With PPC campaigns, you only pay for the clicks you generate. This means you’re only paying for the people who actually click through on the ad and visit the landing page you intended them to visit.

3. You can easily track conversions to measure ROI

By adding conversion pixels to your landing pages, PPC allows you to identify the exact cost-per-lead of your campaign, which can be a lot more arduous to generate with other marketing tactics. As a result, you’re able to continually tweak and optimize your ads to decrease the cost-per-lead.

How to measure PPC success

The truth is there are dozens of PPC metrics you can track. So, which ones matter most when it comes to reaching your business goals?

Rather than focusing solely on PPC analytics like clicks, impressions and click-through rates, here are some metrics that allow you to analyze macro metrics that speak to the ROI of your efforts:

  • Cost-per-conversion. This helps you determine if the PPC clicks you’re generating represent quality traffic that’s actually converting into sales.
  • Most valuable keywords. Being able to track which keywords lead to sales can help you zero in on where to give credit within your PPC campaigns.
  • Lifetime value of PPC customers. Once you have an understanding of how much it costs to convert a PPC lead, compare that to the other cost-per-customer marketing tactics against the lifetime value of your customers.

At the end of the day, PPC can be an incredibly cost-effective way to generate leads through search engines. The key is to look at the right metrics for the right situations and use that data to make the most meaningful changes to your campaigns.

Source: 3 reasons pay-per-click matters for your business – The Business Journals

07- Sep2016
Posted By: Guardian Owl
156 Views

Search Engine Marketing – The ROI of AdWords Spend for B2B Firms : MarketingProfs Article

What is the return on investment for B2B companies when they spend on Google AdWords search advertising?

To find out, Bizible examined 1H16 data from 120 B2B companies in six industries. The researchers obtained a wide range of information from each firm, including monthly lead count, lead count attributable to AdWords, revenue, marketing spend, AdWord spend, and projected future revenue.

The share of leads brought in by AdWords and the ultimate impact on revenue varies significantly from industry to industry, the analysis found.

For the marketing agencies examined, AdWords spend is responsible for just over 20% of all leads and just under 10% of all revenue, on average.

For B2B financial services firms, AdWords is responsible for more than 30% of leads and revenue.


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The average ROI for marketing agencies on AdWords buys 30 days after the spend is just over 200%; for software companies it is closer to 100%

Projected ROI, which takes into account the expected impact on revenue of AdWords spend beyond 30 days, jumps to over 300% for marketing agencies and to more than 200% for software companies.

About the research: The report was based on 1H16 data from 120 B2B companies in six industries.

Source: Search Engine Marketing – The ROI of AdWords Spend for B2B Firms : MarketingProfs Article