12- Sep2017
Posted By: DPadmin
128 Views

SEO: What to Base Content Decisions On | Practical Ecommerce

Content is the first thing that comes to mind with search engine optimization. There is a process, however, to creating and optimizing strong content.

The process involves four separate tasks: data analysis, programmatic optimization, content creation, and manual optimization. These tasks are often performed by three teams: SEO, marketing, and IT.

This article covers the first of those four tasks, the critical data analysis. Data may not be sexy to most people. But strong data is the basis of every good SEO plan. Do not skip this first step in the content optimization process for any reason, no matter how quickly you need to move. Poor data inevitably leads to poor execution.

Keyword Research

Keyword data shows the potential demand that each keyword concept holds based on how many searches are conducted for that concept in an average month. Demand is an important consideration. It is separate from performance. Demand identifies how strongly you could be driving traffic and revenue to your site for specific keyword concepts. Performance identifies how well you have already done so.

Keyword data shows the potential demand that each keyword concept holds based on how many searches are conducted for that concept in an average month.

The difference between the two is your missed opportunity, which organic search competitors are capitalizing on. (For additional details, see my how-to articles on keyword research planning and execution.)

Search Engine Rankings Data

This data is a little trickier to get without an enterprise SEO platform like Searchmetrics or BrightEdge, or a dedicated search rankings tool. If you cannot afford ranking tools and must do it manually, at least sign out of your search engine accounts and open an incognito window. This is not a foolproof technique, but it’s better than nothing.

When collecting rankings data in the U.S., it makes the most sense to use Google as the engine to target based on the large percentage of traffic it drives. In Google, collect not just the position that individual keywords are ranking at, but also the URL that ranks for that keyword.

Google Search Console Search Query Report

Sadly, the Search Console “queries” report (Search Console > Search Traffic > Search Analytics > Queries) will only yield 2,000 search queries, but it’s the only reliable source of keyword data for Google searches. Everything else is either estimated or inaccurate based on the keyword “not provided” challenge that SEO professionals have faced since the search engines began stripping search query information from referral strings by default in October 2011.

An important aside: Do not use your web analytics’ natural search keywords report as a substitute for this data. It is not accurate, and hasn’t been for years.

Google Search Console also provides average rankings for each keyword. It’s a good idea to keep all the data that any report contains, but you’ll especially want the rankings data because it is the only accurate indicator of Google’s true average ranking for your site.

While the online keyword report showing all 2,000 search queries allows you to click deeper to see all of the URLs that drove natural search impressions and traffic for that keyword, unfortunately there’s no way to download that information. That pairing of a keyword that ranks and the URL that ranks for it can still only be found in bulk with a third-party rankings tool.

SEO Keyword Data Mash up

Using VLOOKUP formulas in Excel, create a worksheet that contains a row for every keyword with columns showing the values from keyword research, rankings, and Google Search Console search query reports. This mash up will inform the next three steps. Save it, update it regularly, and consult it religiously for every important keyword or content-based decision you make.

Web Analytics Sessions and Revenue

While not keyword based, the reports showing sessions or visits, and orders and revenue, by natural search page or URL are another important source of content optimization information.

Whether your analytics platform is Google Analytics, Adobe Analytic, Coremetrics, or something else, your natural search landing page report is one of the most critical tools for determining everything from how well your content is performing today to how well it should perform tomorrow and how you should get there.

If you have the support of an analytics team, it may be tempting to rely on it to do the pulling and analysis of the data for you. Resist that temptation.

If you have the support of an analytics team, it may be tempting to rely on it to do the pulling and analysis of the data for you. Resist that temptation.

To be sure, consult with your analytics experts to get a recommendation on which reports to use in which profiles to get to the correct data that you need: visits or sessions, and orders and revenue. But data analysis inevitably leads to additional questions that can only be answered with additional data.

Rather than requesting and waiting for additional reports to be pulled for different timeframes and with different levels of granularity, it’s much more productive to become familiar enough with the analytics tool to extract the accurate data yourself. You’ll also get a better feel for the data when you’re actually using the tool.

Initiatives, such as supporting new product launches and the need to boost sales in certain areas, will also feed into decisions about which content to create and optimize. But they shouldn’t be the only information you reply on to drive your SEO content plan. If one-time initiatives supersede potential and performance data, your SEO plan will be primarily reactive as opposed to driving broad, strong performance.

 

Source: SEO: What to Base Content Decisions On | Practical Ecommerce

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
242 Views

How to use SEO data in your social media strategy

Everyone understands that a good social media strategy is the holy grail for businesses; it molds the perception of a brand, carries the voice, creates the appeal, and as a result, increases revenue. There are a few fundamentals that can help enhance the strategy, but SEO, or search engine optimization, is hardly ever considered. Big mistake! Here’s why.

I’ll start by stating that social media and SEO are heavily tied to each other. SEO data can help improve your social efforts, and social media can help with the search rankings.

In fact, SEO data provides a bunch of information about your visibility and target audience: who they are, how they search for things, what keywords they’re using and what sites they’re surfing, not to mention the good old profiling data found in Google AnalyticsSimilarWeb and SE Ranking.

Let’s dig in deeper.

Keywords

As a growing brand and business investing a lot into social media appearance, you need to know what people are saying about your company or products. To find that out, you can use different monitoring tools such as Mention or Google Alerts. However, to set the alerts correctly, you need to understand which search terms are being used.

This is where SEO gets into the game. It’s important to determine the most frequent search queries related to your niche. This data helps interpret the social community’s most urgent concerns.

Often, the best insights come from discussions about your niche overall, but not a specific product. In other words, you need to search for the keywords you want to target in organic and paid search and use them to track social media awareness.

As soon as you discover these keywords, you can set alerts or manually do a daily search on various social networks like Twitter, Facebook and so on. Take a look at the example of the keyword “NASA” that’s set up as an alert in Mention:

A note to remember: Your social media success often depends on what’s “right”: right tools, right audience, right keywords, right time, right place.

I spy with my little eye

Sometimes we create our brilliant strategy ourselves — and sometimes we’re not inventing the wheel but using what’s already working. The wheel could be invented by a genius blogger you’re following or your competitor. Whichever the case, you can catch this success right on time to turn the spotlight on your business.

For example, you can use a URL shortener to discover valuable stats about a site. Using goo.gl, you can find the statistics on the clicks and understand which posts that competitors are sharing via their social networks are yielding the best engagement. Just put the link ID instead of the asterisk here: goo.gl/#analytics/goo.gl/*/all_time. For instance: https://goo.gl/#analytics/goo.gl/xv3dB/all_time

And review the following data:

analyticsKnowing what’s working provides you with the competitive edge you’ve been looking for.

Competitor insights

Everyone knows that analyzing your competitors’ efforts and comparing their key performance metrics should be a “must-have” action for success. Decide who your direct competitors are, and which companies and online businesses have a similar audience with an effective content strategy. By analyzing how your product or brand ranks in your niche, you can easily set goals for your social media campaign.

The competitor research tool from SE Ranking helps you find the best competitors’ content and where it’s getting shared the most. Moreover, you can export that data and figure out which content works well on social media. This approach allows you to not only build your content strategy, but also improve your social media efforts.

serankingA note to remember: The more competitor insights you gain by learning your industry leaders, the more chances you will have to improve your customer responsiveness and online brand visibility.

Trends and predictions

Google is making a lot of its enormous cache of data available to marketers through a variety of channels: Google Trends, Google Trends for Websites, Google Insights for Search, as well as via search tools like the Wonder Wheel. Before developing your social media strategies and promo activities, make sure to check these trends to identify what topics are hot for a specific period of time and throw the spotlight on your brand.

For example, if your online store is selling custom t-shirts, you can determine how to present the designs in a more fun and attention-grabbing manner. If you check Google Trends, you’ll see which topics or queries are most popular at certain times so you can modify your social media strategy based on this information. For example, with last year’s Pokémon Go boom in July, you could have thrown Pokémon images into your shared images and postings to help you promote t-Shirts.

(Fun fact: Pokémon Go was launched in July 2016 and saw some of the most amazing growth of the video game in history. The downloads surpassed 750 million.)

pokemon goA note to remember: If you’re not staying on top of hot news, your competitors will.

Bottom line

Using SEO data gives you a good pivot point to start your social conversations. The data you get from it can help inform others. Watch out for what works well, and use that to find conversations on social media to grow your online business.

Source: How to use SEO data in your social media strategy