11- Apr2018
Posted By: DPadmin
23 Views

12 SEO Trends Heating Up 2018

Voice search, for one, will change how we create content.

If your business isn’t taking advantage of using SEO strategies on its website, blogs and social media pages, you’re missing the boat in terms of ranking your business in internet searches. SEO is one of the most effective ways to ensure your customers find your business and buy your products.

As simple as SEO can be to utilize, it is a constantly evolving technique that needs a good understanding and a knowledge base of what is new or on the horizon for ranking schemes. This year is no different, as several SEO trends are coming to light that can help your organization achieve a top result in a Google search, giving your business an edge over your competition. 

Twelve members of the Forbes Agency Council share the SEO trend or change that is impacting their work this year.

1. Voice Search

Voice search will change how we create content. Valuable content will have a more conversational tone that answers questions directly. The idea of creating content around a specific keyword bucket will no longer exist. It’s about creating content for searcher intent. Search engines can interpret context so that content that answers a question and contains information about a topic will win. – Loren Baker, Foundation Digital

2. Link-Worthy, Useful Content

In 2018, engagement will play an even larger role in achieving SEO success overall. Creating link-worthy, user-driven content that answers relevant questions and provides useful information to prospects is pivotal. Schema is another area that will continue to be a focal point in achieving measurable results within organic search online. – Bryan Shetsky, Lamark Media

3. Secure Links (SSL)

A couple of years ago, Google announced that secured website certificates (SSL) were starting to impact the ranking of websites. Recently, we noticed that browsers such as Chrome are flagging sites that don’t begin with HTTPS as being potentially unsafe. At $39/year, this is one of the least expensive and easiest fixes to boost SEO ranking in 2018. – Ahmad Kareh, Twistlab Marketing

4. Searcher Intent

Google’s focus on matching search results to the unique intent of a searcher’s query will most impact our SEO work this year. We now must look beyond keywords and traditional ranking factors to understand the types of content the search engines deem relevant for priority terms. We’re also looking beyond the first page to understand unique opportunities and threats by vertical. – Nina Hale, Nina Hale, Inc

5. Subdomain Versus Subdirectory

We recently migrated our blog from a subdomain to a subdirectory in our root domain. We have been seeing how this can be beneficial for our root domain to increase domain authority. We have also put all of our efforts into our blog to not have the benefit of increased visibility for our top-level domain, which is the most important one in the long run. – Martha Madero Gonzalez, GROU Crecimiento Digital

6. Video SEO

study done by Cisco last year predicted that by 2021, video will account for over 82% of all consumer internet traffic. That means in the next few years, video content will by far surpass all forms of other content. On top of that, YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world. The massive opportunity to get your brand in front of your prospects is creating optimized video content. – Marc Hardgrove, The HOTH

7. Battle Of The Snippets

The biggest change is the expanded Google SERP features. In addition to achieving page one, top three rankings, our goal is to have our clients be featured with expanded schema usage, as well as varied featured snippets. – Charles KimExecutive Digital

8. SEO-Rich, Long-Form Content

We are writing more long-form content in 2018. Content pages of 1,500 words or more are performing better in the search engine rankings and drawing more organic traffic than shorter pages. Studies show that users stay on these pages longer and long-form content receives more backlinks and social shares. Focusing on evergreen topics and high-quality writing is key to success. – Peter Boyd, PaperStreet Web Design

9. The Power Of Social Media

While this may not be news to many, it certainly is to others. Google and other search engines are placing a seemingly ever-increasing priority on content engagement across platforms, making likes, retweets, shares and social clicks more important than ever before. Ensure you have a strategy that incorporates social media and that you are posting content your audience will engage with. – Jacob Hanson, PR with Panache!

10. Site Speed

While there have been numerous hints leading up to it and we’ve been preparing clients for it, Google has officially announced site speed as a ranking factor. Users want results and they want them fast. Site speed also drives higher conversion rates so it’s an investment that can make cents (see what I did there). – Jon Clark, Fuze SEO, LLC

11. Mobile Renaissance (Again)

The change from a desktop-based to a mobile-based Google index is imminent, requiring responsive design or better alignment between content on mobile and desktop sites. Google officially announced that page speed is a ranking factor for mobile results, making its AMP technology more appealing. Lastly, Progressive Web Apps will have greater support on iPhones, impacting mobile design trends. – Paul Shapiro,Catalyst, a GroupM and WPP Agency

 12. Proliferation Of Smart Devices

The one overall thing I can think of is the proliferation of smart devices like Alexa, Google Home and Apple Home Pod, in addition to the smart assistants on our devices like Siri and Google App. There is more natural language search and voice input going on, and it’s how one sets themselves up for SEO success in a voice-driven search world. – Timothy Nichols, ExactDrive, Inc

Source: 12 SEO Trends Heating Up 2018

06- Mar2018
Posted By: DPadmin
52 Views

6 facts to nail your PPC strategies in 2018 | Marketing Interactive

A research from OMD China tracked search behaviors of 150 individuals for two weeks across all their devices to understand what truly works for search advertising.

Search remains an essential component of every marketer’s arsenal, yet in China there is little understanding of the practice beyond spends, keywords and bidding.

Bhasker Jaiswal, managing partner of marketing sciences at OMD China, added that China’s search landscape has changed so fast that generic (pay-per-click) strategies don’t suffice.

Generic PPC strategies just don’t suffice anymore.

And it was marketers’ duties to delve further. The latest industry research report from OMD China, dubbed “DIVE SEARCH”, tracked search behaviors of 150 individuals for two weeks across all their devices, collecting over 13,000 search strings to shred some lights on consumer search behaviours, as well as how search advertising influences their purchase decisions.

They don’t really care about your product.

According to the study, a majority of the consumer searches are actually about basic life necessities. Product and service related searches only make up 19% of total search.

The less they know, the more they search.

 

Interestingly, females search far more than males in the automotive category (8.1 vs 5.8) and males search more on skincare than females (6 vs 4.7), indicating that those who actively search your products online are not always your target customers.

When they search, they dive.

Consumers are also found to be “information-hungry”. 90% of searchers go beyond the first search page, and 80% use more than one search engine.

No surprise, mobile eclipses PC.

 

Consumers switch search device depending on time of the day, but in general, mobile is used for its availability and PC for viewability. Mobile has exceeded PC to become the number one device used for search (52% vs 41%).

Search advertising does have a role

 

Impact of search advertising on consumer purchase decision is still significant, and it’s figure-proven. For the auto category, 69% of users find Brandzone more attractive than regular search pages, and 83% of them will click on promotional links to get more information.

Older generations adopt audio-search more than younger ones

Consumers are adopting new search technology; 97% of searchers use auto-completion while searching, and 68% use voice or picture search. Older generations use these features more often than the young for convenience.

Source: 6 facts to nail your PPC strategies in 2018 | Marketing Interactive

01- Mar2018
Posted By: DPadmin
10 Views

SEO trends in 2018: What do the experts predict? | Econsultancy

What can 2018 throw at us that can top the un-ending dystopian nightmare of 2017?

Thankfully, in this article we’re concentrating solely on SEO (..and breathe). We’ve already looked at the big trends from this year, now let’s look into the crystal ball with the help of some search experts.

Local marketing

I think we’ll see Google push again at local marketing. This will likely mean even more improvements to Google Local but I think we might also see expanded use and tests with coupons and codes in PPC.

Organic short-sightedness?

There is a common opinion I’ve seen growing which I think is partly as a result of the market and regulatory changes that happened in 2017 (Google’s TAC – Traffic Acquisition Costs – increasing, and their loss in the EU dispute) and partly as a result of the incredible UI changes Google has rolled out as they’ve gone mobile-first, card-based, and ML-powered. The received wisdom is that it is getting harder and harder to get organic traffic from Google, and that more and more clicks go to either ads or Google’s own properties.

I predict that we will see some brands pull back from organic search investments as a result, and that it will hurt them in the long-run.

The reality (from clickstream data) is that it’s really easy to forget how long the long-tail is and how sparse search features and ads are on the extreme long-tail:

  1. Only 3-4% of all searches result in a click on an ad, for example. Google’s incredible (and still growing) business is based on a small subset of commercial searches.
  2. Google’s share of all outbound referral traffic across the web is growing (and Facebook’s is shrinking as they increasingly wall off their garden).

The opportunity is therefore there for smart brands to capitalise on a growing opportunity while their competitors sink time and money into a social space that is increasingly all about Facebook, and increasingly pay-to-play. I think that is going to be a trend through 2018.

‘Voice-A-Geddon’?

Recently some of the biggest brands are waking up and realising that as we begin to move towards voice, and move further away from the keyword game, the SERPs landscape and the content produced will change dramatically. Like with Mobile-Geddon, we will see a Voice-A-Geddon.

Are brands ready? How will Google (and Amazon) respond to this? Will position one be the new page one? And how will advertisers deal with this? Will organic be considered ever more important?

What will be the commercial impact for those who are prepared vs those who are not?

We’ll see more measurement of conversational UX/voice search. I can see Google creating Analytics for voice commands – for example a way to measure the most common intents and conversation patterns:

Me: OK Google, tell me what films are showing in Leeds tonight

Google: OK Mike, films are X Y & Z

Me: Tell me about Y

Google Synopsis for Y is …

Me: Book me some tickets for Y tonight

Google: Done

This example could measure the conversion rate from Google home devices, of those people that ask for a synopsis what percentage go on to book tickets. If on Alexa, what entities and utterances have been used by category and therefore work out intent per product category?

Data and privacy

Andrew Girdwood:

I think we’ll see ongoing focus on data and privacy. This will manifest with the likes of GDPR, new EU privacy rules (which the UK may or may not get in on) and data security. Helping to keep the latter in focus will be various governments increasingly concerned with cryptography and perhaps with legislation struggling to keep up with the pace of technology.

This loops back to search marketing because some of the analytics practices used by big brands in the US and the UK are enough to make you blink.

GDPR will make life more difficult for agencies, there’s greater risk to agencies and clients in sharing personally identifiable information (e.g. PPC, email marketing etc.). The new E-Privacy regulation may have a huge impact on analytics tools such as Google Analytics but still too early to be certain.

Faster, Google-centric UX

Tim Grice:

We’ll see further moves towards a faster mobile friendly web. Features that allow you to access products, services information without leaving Google in preparatiob for voice search. There will be less reliance on links with a potential move towards sentiment and mentions

‘War for the living room’

Andrew Girdwood:

Lastly, I think we’ll see tech brands ramping up the war for the living room. This will manifest through hardware pushes such as connected TVs, personal assistants like Alexa and even VR. I’m not confident enough to predict whether there will be much progress on that front beyond the advertising campaigns I’m expecting but if I had to pick a winner I could always roll an internet connected dice for you.

Source: SEO trends in 2018: What do the experts predict? | Econsultancy