July 2017

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
149 Views

SEO: 7 Reasons to Use a Site Crawler 

No matter how well you think you know your site, a crawler will always turn up something new. In some cases, it’s those things that you don’t know about that can sink your SEO ship.

Search engines use highly developed bots to crawl the web looking for content to index. If a search engine’s crawlers can’t find the content on your site, it won’t rank or drive natural search traffic. Even if it’s findable, if the content on your site isn’t sending the appropriate relevance signals, it still won’t rank or drive natural search traffic.

Since they mimic the actions of more sophisticated search engine crawlers, third-party crawlers, such as DeepCrawl and Screaming Frog’s SEO Spider, can uncover a wide variety of technical and content issues to improve natural search performance.

7 Reasons to Use a Site Crawler

What’s out there? Owners and managers think of their websites as the pieces that customers will (hopefully) see. But search engines find and remember all the obsolete and orphaned areas of sites, as well. A crawler can help catalog the outdated content so that you can determine what to do next. Maybe some of it is still useful if it’s refreshed. Maybe some of it can be 301 redirected so that its link authority can strengthen other areas of the site.

How is this page performing? Some crawlers can pull analytics data in from Google Search Console and Google Analytics. They make it easy to view correlations between the performance of individual pages and the data found on the page itself.

Not enough indexation or way too much? By omission, crawlers can identify what’s potentially not accessible by bots. If your crawl report has some holes where you know sections of your site should be, can bots access that content? If not, there might be a problem with disallows, noindexcommands, or the way it’s coded that is keeping bots out.

Alternately, a crawler can show you when you have duplicate content. When your sifting through the URLs listed, look for telltale signs like redundant product ID numbers or duplicate title tags or other signs that the content might be the same between two or more pages.

Keep in mind that the ability to crawl does not equate to indexation, merely the ability to be indexed.

What’s that error, and why is that redirecting? Crawlers make finding and reviewing technical fixes much faster. A quick crawl of the site automatically returns a server header status code for every page encountered. Simply filter for the 404s and you have a list of errors to track down. Need to test those redirects that just went live? Switch to list mode and specify the old URLs to crawl. Your crawler will tell you which are redirecting and where they’re sending visitors to now.

Is the metadata complete? Without a crawler, it’s too difficult to identify existing metadata and create a plan to optimize it on a larger scale. Use it to quickly gather data about title tags, meta descriptions, and keywords, H headings, language tags, and more.

Does the site send mixed signals? When not structured correctly, data on individual pages can tie bots into knots. Canonical tags and robots directives, in combination with redirects and disallows affecting the same pages, can send a combination of confusing signals to search engines that can mess up your indexation and ability to perform in natural search.

If you have a sudden problem with performance in a key page, check for a noindex directive and, also, confirm the page that the canonical tag specifies. Does it convey contradictory signals to a redirect sending traffic to the page, or a disallow in the robots.txt file? You never know when something could accidentally change as a result of some other release that developers pushed out.

Is the text correct? Some crawlers also allow you to search for custom bits of text on a page. Maybe your company is rebranding and you want to be sure that you find every instance of the old brand on the site. Or maybe you recently updated schema on a page template and you want to be sure that it’s found on certain pages. If it’s something that involves searching for and reporting on a piece of text within the source code of a group of web pages, your crawler can help.

Plan Crawl Times

It’s important to remember, however, that third-party crawlers can put a heavy burden on your servers. They tend to be set to crawl too quickly as a default, and the rapid-fire requests can stress your servers if they’re already experiencing a high customer volume. Your development team may even have blocked your crawler previously based on suspected scraping by spammers.

Talk to your developers to explain what you need to accomplish and ask for the best time to do it. They almost certainly have a crawler that they use — they may even be able to give you access to their software license. Or they may volunteer to do the crawl for you and send you the file. At the least, they’ll want to advise you as to the best times of day to crawl and the frequency at which to set the bot’s requests. It’s a small courtesy that helps build respect.

Source: SEO: 7 Reasons to Use a Site Crawler | Practical Ecommerce

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
329 Views

3 SEO Wins (Often Overlooked) for Ecommerce Sites 

There is more to search engine optimization than keywords, titles, meta descriptions, and H1s. In this post, I’ll address three valuable, and often overlooked, SEO opportunities for ecommerce sites: PDFs, store locators, and product images.

PDFs and PDF Viewers

Many ecommerce sites host a decent number of PDFs. You might not think that there is SEO value in them, or even know where to start if you wanted to optimize them. But, you’d be wrong to ignore them. Let me show you.

PDF is the typical digital format for product information sheets, user manuals, and catalogs.

You can find how many PDFs Google has indexed for any site by searching with:

site:sitename.com filetype:pdf.

Search site:sitename.com filetype:pdf for any site to see PDFs indexed by Google. The Home Depot has 163,000 PDFs indexed at the time of this writing.

Search site:sitename.com filetype:pdf for any site to see PDFs indexed by Google. The Home Depot has 163,000 PDFs indexed at the time of this writing.

These PDFs accumulate valuable links like any other web page, and could help the SEO of the site if optimized correctly.

For example, a PDF guide from Home Depot for a smoke and carbon monoxide alarm has eight backlinks, according to Ahrefs, a backlink checking tool.

Sadly, like most PDFs, it doesn’t have any links back to the site. The backlinks help the PDF get indexed and ranked, but they don’t benefit the rest of the site. When users find the guide in the search results, those visits won’t be tracked in analytics. There won’t be a way for them to navigate to the rest of the site and potentially order other products.

The best way to optimize the PDFs to benefit overall site traffic is to use an HTTP canonical headerand choose one of two options:

  • If the PDF is a duplicate of information already available on the site, for example a product information sheet, set the PDF’s HTTP header canonical to the page that it is duplicating.
  • If the PDF has no HTML equivalent, add a PDF viewer and canonicalize the page to it.

The choice of canonicalizing to a PDF viewer requires a bit more explanation.

The main advantage of a PDF viewer is that you can add your site navigation and analytics tags, and enable users (and search engines) to follow links and navigate your site. The HTTP header canonical effectively replaces the PDFs on the search results and replaces them with the canonical URLs.

You can verify that the HTTP canonical header is set up correctly using Google Chrome Developer Tools.

You can verify that the HTTP canonical header is set up correctly using Google Chrome Developer Tools.

ViewerJS is a popular open source JavaScript-based PDF viewer. Some sites host their PDFs and media files with third party vendors like Scene 7 and Endeca.

Make sure your vendor supports cross-domain HTTP canonical headers so you can get the SEO value out of your PDFs. Scene7 explains this in, ironically, a PDF. It addresses adding canonicals to images, which Google does not support, but the instructions apply to PDFs.

Store Locators

Store locators are another opportunity to drive nearby mobile users. But traveling around the country and pulling out your phone to see if the store locator is working correctly is very unpractical (and expensive). Fortunately, you can use Google Chrome’s powerful emulation features, to virtually travel anywhere in the world.

Let me explain the steps to use this fascinating feature.

First, I’ll review the store locator from a mobile user’s point of view, and then also check if the stores are ranking high in Google Maps.

Using Chrome's Developer tools, we can see a mobile user's point of view.

Using Chrome’s Developer tools, we can see a mobile user’s point of view.

You can access Google Chrome Developer Tools under View > Developer > Developer Tools.

Next, I’ll pretend to be in San Francisco by clicking the three vertical dots, and then More tools > Sensors and setting my location to the coordinates of San Francisco.

Click on More tools > Sensors to set your location to San Francisco, as long as you know the coordinates.

Click on More tools > Sensors to set your location to San Francisco, as long as you know the coordinates.

You can simulate being anywhere in the world as long as you know the coordinates, or you can select one of the predefined ones.

Next, I’ll obtain a list of the Bed Bath & Beyond stores in San Francisco from that company’s website.

Using Developer Tools, we can search for the closest store as if we were using a mobile device.

Using Developer Tools, we can search for the closest store as if we were using a mobile device.

The closest San Francisco store is on 555 9th Street. Now, let’s see how the store ranks in Google Maps. The branded searches are the easiest to rank.

By performing a Google search on a mobile phone, we can see how the store ranks in Google Maps. This search result also includes a Knowledge Graph for this Bed Bath & Beyond location.

By performing a Google search on a mobile phone, we can see how the store ranks in Google Maps. This search result also includes a Knowledge Graph for this Bed Bath & Beyond location.

I searched for “bed bath and beyond near me.” Google provided the closest store as listed by the store locator. Having Google My Business listings for each store should be enough to rank for navigational searches like these.

But what if I perform a non-branded search, such as “kitchenware near me”?

Performing a non-branded search like "kitchenware" shows less conclusive results.

Performing a non-branded search like “kitchenware” shows less conclusive results.

Bed Bath & Beyond products show up as sponsored listings, but no locations show up in the organic results, not even if the results are sorted by distance, where Bed Bath & Beyond is clearly closer than the competitors.

That’s because Google is prioritizing keyword relevance over proximity, for stores that include “kitchen” in the label. If I search for “bedding near me,” I do see Bed Bath & Beyond ranking third — two competitors have closer stores.

When searching "bedding near me," Bed, Bath & Beyond ranks third because two competitors have closer locations.

When searching “bedding near me,” Bed, Bath & Beyond ranks third because two competitors have closer locations.

To improve your local store rankings, follow these tips, which many of the top-ranking stores use.

  • Provide a web page for every store using a hierarchy of /country/city/store. Googlebot should be able to crawl every store by following links, starting from the home page.
  • Make each store profile unique and valuable. List all relevant information, such as hours of operation, phone numbers, map of the location, and reviews.
  • Verify all your stores in Google My Business using the bulk upload feature. Download the sample template, and make sure to provide all the required info.
  • Research how users are searching for your business, and use that to guide your ideal title tags. For example, as noted above Bed Bath & Beyond is missing out on organic listings for “kitchenware near me.”

Product Images

Google image search represents as much as 10 percent of total search visitors to many ecommerce sites. Track image search visits in Google Search Console, under Search Traffic > Search Analytics, and select Search Type: Image.

Track image search visits in Google Search Console. Go to Search Traffic > Search Analytics > Search Type: Image.

Track image search visits in Google Search Console. Go to Search Traffic > Search Analytics > Search Type: Image.

But, how valuable are image searches? Aren’t image searches typically writers, bloggers, or speakers?

This line of thinking assumes that images only rank when people search in Google images. But Google often blends images with regular web search results. Also, Google image search is easier now, from phones, using the Chrome app. Think about a consumer taking pictures of a product on your competitor’s shelf, and using Google search by image to shop around for a better deal.

Optimize your images by following Google’s comprehensive steps.

  • Avoid excessive text in images. Use CSS to overlay the text, instead.
  • Avoid generic image file names, such as IMG0003.JPG, and use, for example, frying-pan.jpginstead.
  • Use ALT text to describe what the image contains. It is important that all product images include the name of the product as ALT text.
  • The content around an image can help search engines know a lot about what is it about. Alternatively, use the optional caption attribute in your image XML sitemaps.

Source: 3 SEO Wins (Often Overlooked) for Ecommerce Sites | Practical Ecommerce

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
153 Views

What 2 Big Changes to Google AdWords Mean for PPC Marketers

Performance marketing — especially PPC — is a powerful way for marketers to demonstrate their worth.

With PPC campaigns, we’ve carved out our place at the table. Now we’re producers of actual revenue, beyond more qualitative channels like PR and content.

This is good news for digital advertisers. But does Google have other ideas?

Let’s take a closer look at some of the new and ongoing changes to Google AdWords. We’ll also discuss how you might want to take advantage of them.

Ongoing Changes to AdWords

Earlier this year, Google announced changes to AdWords and the Google Display Network (GDN) for this summer:

Change #1: Ad Rank

The Ad Rank threshold change, revealed in May, is twofold. Ad Rank essentially determines the placement of your text ad. A higher Ad Rank means you’re more likely to hit the coveted Position 1 slot.

Ad Rank is calculated by through a number of factors. These include expected click-through rate (CTR), landing page experience, maximum cost-per-click (CPC) bid, and relevance.

Relevance is going to take a more significant role in determining Ad Rank. While base search terms may remain the same, queries may differ due to context. For example, a recent news story mentioning a product name might be more relevant to a query than a product review.

More importantly, depending on the query meaning, PPC bids “may” be weighted more heavily for Ad Rank. This means that higher bids for relevant queries could directly boost your Ad Rank. Bigger ad spends may ultimately win out.

Change #2: Enhanced CPC

AdWords is also removing the 30 percent enhanced CPC (ECPC) cap on audience and location dimensions. This doesn’t currently account for device dimensions, so you should still plan to add a mobile bid adjustment.

Google’s official line is that this change will help you drive more quality conversions so you don’t risk losing out on them because your bids were capped. But with ECPC uncapped, you may end up looking at higher overall spend. If you use ECPC, you should watch such PPC campaigns closely.

These changes to Ad Rank thresholds and Enhanced CPC caps have the potential to run up your spend. They may also increase competition from larger advertisers with bigger budgets. Still, not necessarily anything earthshaking here.

Ongoing Changes to PLAs & the Google Display Network

Google is also taking its Retail Shopping on Display program out of beta for PPC advertisers who opted in. The test queued up Product Listing Ads (PLAs) to appear on the Google Display Network (GDN).

However, this was only for display in fashion and home decor websites. These brave early adopters will see their ads deployed there over the rest of the summer.

Effectively, with this limited, opt-in test program, Google is pushing more ads to display. And at Marketing Next, the company announced even faster AMP page load speeds for search and GDN ads. GDN ads now load up to five seconds faster than normal. You’re probably starting to see where this is going.

PPC trends - PLAs on GDN

New Attribution Promotes the Changing Customer Journey

Stop me if you’ve heard this before. The customer decision journey is changing.

In response to this, Google is now encouraging advertisers to stop focusing on “last-click attribution.” That is, focus more on upper-funnel clicks instead of tracking the last click a user makes before making a purchase.

After all, that early purchase research is valuable. Plus, if you can track insights on those earlier clicks, you should be better able to understand your customers. You’ll also be able to better direct them to purchase next time, right?

This is why Google is pushing alternative attribution models for PPC campaigns, such as time decay, linear, position-based, and its most prominent model, data-driven attribution (DDA).

In fact, Google has outright stated that “data-driven attribution delivers better results than last-click.” Google is promoting how its machine learning-based attribution system picks up not only on deep-funnel activity but also upper-funnel activity, leading to more overall conversions.

Sounds good, doesn’t it?

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Chrome Moves to Ad Filtering

And now we move to arguably the biggest news in digital at the moment. Google recently announced a built-in ad blocker — or as the search giant prefers to call it, an “ad filter” — to an upcoming version of Chrome. This feature will remove “annoying, intrusive ads on the web.” This is a story so big, it has made its way outside of ad tech circles onto the pages of The Wall Street JournalFortune Magazine and Wired, to name just a few.

To be fair, Google’s claims do appear justified. There’s definitely no shortage of annoying pop-up and timed prestitial ads online. And they significantly detract from page load speeds and overall user experience.

Plus, the company has released, by way of DoubleClick, a full guide to making sure your ads are not “annoying” and will not be filtered out by the new version of Chrome.

Which ads are most likely to get through unscathed? According to DoubleClick, for mobile, “small ads that stick to the top or bottom of the screen,” and for desktop, takeovers. Presumably, we’ll see GDN standards converge with the ad filter’s guidelines.

So, What Do All of These Mean?

Google knows PPC continues to be a powerful, profitable category. PPC will generate significant revenue this year and next – that’s a fact.

But let’s be honest – Google is also a corporation. And like many corporations, it seeks to grow its revenue and profits with new opportunities. Given the growth in mobile and the lengthening of the sales funnel in so many verticals, analysts have already predicted that display spend would outpace search spend.

So why is Google moving in this direction?

Being a corporation that wants to grow its business, it’s simply following the money. Some of the changes to further monetize AdWords, such as the Ad Rank threshold and ECPC changes, are ways for Google to incrementally grow AdWords revenue from PPC campaigns.

However, the company is clearly going after bigger fish. That means gently nudging advertisers like you towards adding more display to your marketing mix.

Revisiting GDN: How Should You Approach This?

As you know, GDN is a huge display ad network that runs ads on over two million websites that reach more than 90% of the internet audience. GDN offers text, banner, Gmail, and in-app ad options. And for some time, let’s just say it has not always played nicely with traditional search campaigns for PPC. The most well-known option for running search campaigns in tandem with GDN is, of course, Search Network with Display Select campaigns.

Unfortunately, even Google does not necessarily recommend Search with Display Select for advertisers interested in running campaigns on both platforms. For one thing, these two channels often message to customers in very different funnel stages. Ultimately, this can often result in GDN campaigns eating up campaign budget with very few conversions from prospects who, being at the very top of the funnel, have little to no immediate purchasing intent.

So what should you, as a PPC advertiser, do?

What you’ve always done — focus on driving the best return on your ad spend. Stay focused on conversions, revenue, overall profits or efficiency, whichever suits your goals.

Every marketing operation is different. And you are the expert on the best ways to run your specific campaigns. Not Google. If this means you continue to focus on lower-funnel campaigns through channels such as search to drive the best ROI, so be it.

No one, not even Google, knows your campaigns or your specific business needs better than you do.

Some Tips for Getting Into GDN from PPC

That said, if you’re a digital advertiser focused on PPC, but considering GDN, I recommend the following:

  • Focus on what works, but don’t be afraid to test. As an experienced PPC professional, you already have a strong sense of what works in digital. Continue driving revenue using the strategies that work best for you. But like with your AdWords campaigns, don’t be afraid to test new campaign types — including GDN.
  • Be aware of quick run-ups in spend with low conversion rate. Display campaigns can quickly run through spend, often much faster than PPC. As discussed, because display ads tend to be awareness plays, expect to reach less engaged audiences less likely to convert.
  • Differentiate messaging. At the risk of stating the obvious, customers finding your PPC ads through search are deeper in the funnel than those served a GDN banner ad. Resist the urge to copy-paste. Make sure you’re using proper messaging for intent-driven search customers. Use different messaging where needed for higher-funnel, lower-engagement GDN customers.
  • Consider GDN for remarketing. One of the most powerful ways to use GDN is remarketing. You can use tactics such as in-market audiences (which targets audiences by the history of related searches) and Google’s newly announced life events feature (which targets audiences based on major life events such as graduations and marriages). Remarketing can be a powerful way to drive conversions of significantly higher quality. However, I recommend also instituting frequency caps to ensure you’re not inundating your audience with the same ad units.
  • Be mindful of the guidelines for Chrome’s upcoming ad filter. As mentioned, a future version of Chrome will, in fact, filter out “annoying” ad units. Make sure your ads conform to the guidelines. And of course, stay on the lookout for any future additions or specifics.

Conclusion

That should more or less cover the direction that Google seems to be not-so-subtly nudging digital towards. In other words, to more top-of-funnel in general, and most likely GDN in specific.

This change is likely happening because Google is a company that needs to keep growing its revenue over time. But now that you’re forewarned, you may want to keep an eye out for future developments along these lines.

Source: What 2 Big Changes to Google AdWords Mean for PPC Marketers

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
229 Views

5 Tools That Will Make Your SEO Life Much Easier

These tools will help your business grow, generate leads, develop customer loyalty, and make more money – all while keeping your clients and teams happy.

5 Tools That Will Make Your SEO Life Much Easier

Working with hundreds of clients and projects on a daily basis, digital agencies and SEO professionals with a lot of projects spend an enormous amount of time estimating, developing strategies, analyzing, and reporting.

Simultaneously, the business has to grow, generate leads, and develop customer loyalty. And, of course, make more money.

How in the world can you make all of these things happen while making your clients and teams happy at the same time?

Certainly, there are many ways for agencies and SEO pros to increase their revenue and customer loyalty regardless of whether it’s generated through new technologies or via enhanced internal processes.

Working close with agencies, though, we’ve identified five of the most common pain points they are struggling with:

  • Finding solutions on how to personalize and enhance relationships with their clients,
  • Finding new ways to generate leads.
  • Building better value proposition.
  • Accelerating strategy execution.
  • Creating more accurate forecasting.

Automation, new widgets, and tools are often the cure for the problems.

Below is a collection of tools and options that can help with reaching these objectives to the best satisfaction of all parties involved.

1. Generate More Qualified Leads Using Lead Generator Widget

Lead generator is a great tool that helps attract qualified leads using instant SEO audit as an attraction.

It’s a widget (or a webform, if you will) installed on your website that provides your potential clients with a detailed report on how well their webpage is optimized for a certain search query.

In exchange, you are getting their contact information along with their report ending up with a “hot” lead and a list of their problems at hand to start the conversation going.

There are some widgets on the market to choose from.

SE Ranking offers this option within their top plans. It looks very sleek and can be customized to reflect your unique brand styling.

PR and Digital Marketing Agency

The popped-out form:

PR and Digital Marketing AgencyPR and Digital Marketing Agency

Here is how easily (as simple as 1-2-3) you can customize and install the webform and start generating leads today:

Step 1: Select the widget type and install it: choose the form, the color, the budget, the text and where you want to place it on a site.

Lead Generation

Step 2: Add a small piece of the HTML code to your website pages.

Lead Generation

Step 3: Get alerts on new leads and convert them into your potential clients.

That’s it!

2. Build Trust & Personalize a Client-Agency Relationship

White Label is quite a popular option in SEO platforms as it is aimed at presenting your SEO services as your own technology. Not all of the SEO platforms offer White Label as part of the subscription. So, look for services like SE Ranking that has this option within their pricing plans.

The value of White Label in building trust and credibility with your clients is indisputable. With minimum development work, you can use your domain or subdomain to provide personalized SEO services to your clients. Let’s look inside the system to see how it works, using SE Ranking as an illustration.

By employing White Label option, you can customize the system to reflect your own interface and login page, change the header and footer of your own domain and adapt the look of email templates to fit your agency styling.

The reports you’ll be sending to your clients will look like they’ve been generated via your own SEO technology. Moreover, all your SEO reports can be sent via your own SMTP server.

Lead Generation

It is easy to add and manage users with custom access to other SEO features like rank tracking, backlink monitoring, website audit, etc. There is never a hint of connection between your agency and SE Ranking and since the platform is cloud-based, there are no hosting or maintenance issues.

3. Use Marketing Plan to Speed up Estimation & Enhance Accuracy

Regardless of how many times you’ve provided the estimation and developed a strategy for your clients, more often than not it takes an arm and a leg to create a document that’s both impressive and accurate.

What if you could automate this process and come up with a personalized plan built based on the best practices in the field – with the simple click of a mouse?

Tools like Marketing Plan from SE Ranking do just that.

Lead Generation

Automating the estimation and preliminary strategy within the initial stages of your sales cycle effectively cuts the time it takes to execute while ensuring accuracy.

Also, the beauty of it is in how easily you can customize the plan, add your points, get a complete list of tasks, and disperse these tasks among your team members. It’s like a mini project management tool at your fingertips with an SEO twist.

4.  Develop Ambassadors Using Top-Notch Reporting

Beautiful, detailed and comprehensive reports are the base of making your customers happy and thus, loyal. It’s also the most painful part for agencies since reports take so much time to develop.

Using reporting tools in an SEO platform makes this tedious task so much easier.

For example, the Report Builder from SE Ranking helps create professional reports and impress even the most demanding clients. You can add a personalized look to your reports by adding your logo and contact info in the header.

Additionally, make them easily accessible with the option to download them in different formats: .pdf, .xls, .html, .csv. You can send and get reports automatically to selected e-mails on a regular basis.

Lead Generation

Lead Generation

The tool works in a manual, automatic, or scheduled mode. A nice touch is the Drag and Drop. These modules help make your SEO reports look comprehensive and elegant.

5. Budgeting Is a Science – Treat It Accordingly

Forecasting and the estimation of your SEO potential is a crucial puzzle piece for generating greater revenue while simultaneously making your clients happy.

You can still use Excel files and guess how much return on investment you might get from your SEO efforts. Or, you can use tools such as SEO Potential from SE Ranking to forecast and justify your budgeting.

This feature uses a sophisticated formula to predict the results of your SEO investments.

For example, by using this tool, you can easily predict how many clicks your client can get based on their search rankings. Alternatively, assess the expected traffic volume, quantity of clients and traffic cost via Google AdWords. You can then generate the reports and export them into different formats to present them in detail to your clients.

Lead Generation

In the modern business environment, making more money is not just about increasing your rates or advertising budget. It’s also about value proposition, business processes, and technologies. These are the factors that really affect the bottom of the funnel in the long run, as well as the overall health and business efficiency of your organization.

Using platforms such as SE Ranking, which offers basically everything that you need to successfully operate your digital agency or provide freelance services, might help eliminate unnecessary clutter and complexity while helping you grow a prosperous business and long-term client relationships in the tough field of digital marketing.

Source: 5 Tools That Will Make Your SEO Life Much Easier

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
245 Views

How to use SEO data in your social media strategy

Everyone understands that a good social media strategy is the holy grail for businesses; it molds the perception of a brand, carries the voice, creates the appeal, and as a result, increases revenue. There are a few fundamentals that can help enhance the strategy, but SEO, or search engine optimization, is hardly ever considered. Big mistake! Here’s why.

I’ll start by stating that social media and SEO are heavily tied to each other. SEO data can help improve your social efforts, and social media can help with the search rankings.

In fact, SEO data provides a bunch of information about your visibility and target audience: who they are, how they search for things, what keywords they’re using and what sites they’re surfing, not to mention the good old profiling data found in Google AnalyticsSimilarWeb and SE Ranking.

Let’s dig in deeper.

Keywords

As a growing brand and business investing a lot into social media appearance, you need to know what people are saying about your company or products. To find that out, you can use different monitoring tools such as Mention or Google Alerts. However, to set the alerts correctly, you need to understand which search terms are being used.

This is where SEO gets into the game. It’s important to determine the most frequent search queries related to your niche. This data helps interpret the social community’s most urgent concerns.

Often, the best insights come from discussions about your niche overall, but not a specific product. In other words, you need to search for the keywords you want to target in organic and paid search and use them to track social media awareness.

As soon as you discover these keywords, you can set alerts or manually do a daily search on various social networks like Twitter, Facebook and so on. Take a look at the example of the keyword “NASA” that’s set up as an alert in Mention:

A note to remember: Your social media success often depends on what’s “right”: right tools, right audience, right keywords, right time, right place.

I spy with my little eye

Sometimes we create our brilliant strategy ourselves — and sometimes we’re not inventing the wheel but using what’s already working. The wheel could be invented by a genius blogger you’re following or your competitor. Whichever the case, you can catch this success right on time to turn the spotlight on your business.

For example, you can use a URL shortener to discover valuable stats about a site. Using goo.gl, you can find the statistics on the clicks and understand which posts that competitors are sharing via their social networks are yielding the best engagement. Just put the link ID instead of the asterisk here: goo.gl/#analytics/goo.gl/*/all_time. For instance: https://goo.gl/#analytics/goo.gl/xv3dB/all_time

And review the following data:

analyticsKnowing what’s working provides you with the competitive edge you’ve been looking for.

Competitor insights

Everyone knows that analyzing your competitors’ efforts and comparing their key performance metrics should be a “must-have” action for success. Decide who your direct competitors are, and which companies and online businesses have a similar audience with an effective content strategy. By analyzing how your product or brand ranks in your niche, you can easily set goals for your social media campaign.

The competitor research tool from SE Ranking helps you find the best competitors’ content and where it’s getting shared the most. Moreover, you can export that data and figure out which content works well on social media. This approach allows you to not only build your content strategy, but also improve your social media efforts.

serankingA note to remember: The more competitor insights you gain by learning your industry leaders, the more chances you will have to improve your customer responsiveness and online brand visibility.

Trends and predictions

Google is making a lot of its enormous cache of data available to marketers through a variety of channels: Google Trends, Google Trends for Websites, Google Insights for Search, as well as via search tools like the Wonder Wheel. Before developing your social media strategies and promo activities, make sure to check these trends to identify what topics are hot for a specific period of time and throw the spotlight on your brand.

For example, if your online store is selling custom t-shirts, you can determine how to present the designs in a more fun and attention-grabbing manner. If you check Google Trends, you’ll see which topics or queries are most popular at certain times so you can modify your social media strategy based on this information. For example, with last year’s Pokémon Go boom in July, you could have thrown Pokémon images into your shared images and postings to help you promote t-Shirts.

(Fun fact: Pokémon Go was launched in July 2016 and saw some of the most amazing growth of the video game in history. The downloads surpassed 750 million.)

pokemon goA note to remember: If you’re not staying on top of hot news, your competitors will.

Bottom line

Using SEO data gives you a good pivot point to start your social conversations. The data you get from it can help inform others. Watch out for what works well, and use that to find conversations on social media to grow your online business.

Source: How to use SEO data in your social media strategy

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
102 Views

The SEO Formula: 3 Surefire Hacks to Get Highly Ranked 

Search Engine Optimization is the art, and science, of ranking in Google. It really comes down to two major factors — on-page and off-page SEO. On-page SEO includes creating high-quality, keyword-rich content, optimizing keyword placement, optimizing title tags, technical SEO, etc. Off-page SEO mainly revolves around link building — a task that is crucial to rank at all in the search engines.

While SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization, three crucial factors to dominate in the search results can be remembered with the same acronym. I call this the SEO Formula.

 Tips for getting higher SEO rankings 4:02

S is for Strategy

Tactics are helpful, but strategy is your ticket to online success. For example, hosting an awards or a contest to build links can be way more effective than offering to write guest posts for bloggers.

E is for Expert

Your website should position you as the expert in your industry and offer valuable advice and data to its visitors. This is a great way to establish authority and to attract natural links from trusted sites.

O is for On-Page

Off-page SEO is only half of the equation — many people purely focus on link building and forget that on-page SEO is just as important. These are page elements such as the title tag, headings, and keyword placement in the page copy, and most importantly, the quality of your content.

If you follow this formula, you’ll be well on your way to higher Google rankings — but don’t stop there. The secret to conquering search engine algorithms is to never treat SEO as a one-off task or a project you spend only a couple months on. SEO takes time, testing, and if you’re doing it yourself, a great deal of trial and error.

But don’t give up! Search engine traffic is vital to your online success. The easiest way to tackle SEO and beat out your competitors is to hire an SEO expert to do it for you, or if you want to learn it yourself, coach with an expert. But as long as you follow these tips, you’ll be taking a giant first step toward success in the world of SEO.

Chloe Spencer is a 26-year-old internet entrepreneur and SEO specialist who started her first online business at 14 years old. Today she runs an SEO consulting company, working with clients around the world to improve their search engine rankings, build their traffic and increase their sales. Chloe is also a professional speaker, and has presented at over a dozen conferences since she was 16 years old

Source: The SEO Formula: 3 Surefire Hacks to Get Highly Ranked – NBC News

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
133 Views

How Long Should Your Content Be For Optimal SEO?

Content is king when it comes to SEO. You can’t have an SEO campaign without content; it’s the fuel that makes SEO work.

You’ve heard this all before, but it’s less often that you hear about the specific, objective qualities that make content effective. Millions of businesses and individuals are competing for visibility in search engines, and many of them are writing what is, subjectively, “good” content. But what makes that content “good”?

You can point to the writing style, the target audience, the practicality, and various other subjective factors, but today I want to focus on one specific, objective factor; is the length of your content a predictor of its SEO performance? And if so, what’s the ideal length of content to earn a high ranking in organic search results?

Page Content Minimums

Obviously, different types of content should be considered differently; for example, the core pages of your website don’t need as much content as your blog articles, since they won’t be addressing specific questions and instead will serve as anchor points for your brand. Still, every page of your site needs to have a certain “minimum” amount of content, or else it will be perceived as “thin.”

There’s no clear formula, or single answer for the minimum amount of content a page should have. Some sources suggest having at least 600-700 words of content on every page, which will allow you to include multiple variations of your target keywords and provide a decent amount of information to your readers on almost any subject. However, it won’t take you long to find a top-ranked page that features as little as 300 words.

As you’ll soon see, while content length is correlated with higher rankings, there’s actually another variable that has a stronger influence on rankings. However, for now, understand that at least 300 words is a good minimum to shoot for.

Blog Article Research

So beyond that 300 word absolute minimum, is there a benefit to having longer content? Let’s take a look at the data.

In 2015, Moz and BuzzSumo paired up to produce a content study I still find fascinating and relevant. They collaborated to analyze the number of social shares and links earned by more than one million pieces of content available on the web. One critical insight here is the disproportional distribution of shares and links; 75 percent of content pieces receive no links or shares whatsoever, while the vast majority of links and shares is limited to a minority of content pieces.

Almost in line with this effect, more than 85 percent of written content contains fewer than 1,000 words. However, consistently, content with 1,000 words or more tends to attract significantly more links and shares.

This effect isn’t limited to 2015. A recent report by SEMRushstudying ranking factors in 2017 also found that longer pages tended to rank higher. Researchers calculated a 45 percent difference in length between search entries that appeared within the top 3 rankings, and position 20 entries.

For reference, the average content length for top 3 rankings was about 750 words, while the average content length for position 20 rankings was about 500 words. These data points were gathered by studying more than 600,000 different keywords on a global basis, relying on SEMRush’s more than 1.5 million users.

Overall, it seems that the longer your content is, the higher its chances will be to earn a high ranking—but there are some complicating factors you also need to consider.

Benefits of Short Articles

Just because shorter articles tend to rank lower doesn’t mean short articles are inherently bad. In fact, some of them have some big advantages. For starters, some users prefer to read short content over long content (either due to time restraints or attention limits). If part of your target market happens to prefer short articles (under 500 words), it may be disadvantageous for you to exclusively publish long articles, since you may alienate some readers.

Short articles also offer much more concise answers to user questions; if you’re intending to optimize for specific long-tail keyword phrases, or if you’re trying to get your content featured as a rich answer, it may be better to have a short, concise entry.

Length vs. Density

It’s worth noting at this point that what may matter most isn’t necessarily the length of the content itself, but rather the amount of information available within that content – its density.

It just so happens that longer content naturally tends to include more facts (when it’s well-written) and information. For example, a 300-word, densely written article may have more valuable information in it than a 1,500-word fluff piece.

For that reason, I can’t simply encourage you to write longer pieces of content; the equation isn’t that simple.

The Bottom Line

Obviously, length is just one of many factors that could contribute to your on-page content’s eventual success. Still, it’s an important quality to consider. So what’s the right approach here?

Overall, longer content tends to perform better than shorter content, with pages having 1000 words or more performing best. However, shorter pieces of content (3-500 words) can also perform well, provided they’re densely and intelligently written.

It’s therefore wise to have a diverse mix of different content lengths available to your readers, with a slight skew to longer content, and always a commitment to publishing the best material you can.

Content is king when it comes to SEO. You can’t have an SEO campaign without content; it’s the fuel that makes SEO work.

You’ve heard this all before, but it’s less often that you hear about the specific, objective qualities that make content effective. Millions of businesses and individuals are competing for visibility in search engines, and many of them are writing what is, subjectively, “good” content. But what makes that content “good”?

You can point to the writing style, the target audience, the practicality, and various other subjective factors, but today I want to focus on one specific, objective factor; is the length of your content a predictor of its SEO performance? And if so, what’s the ideal length of content to earn a high ranking in organic search results?

Page Content Minimums

Obviously, different types of content should be considered differently; for example, the core pages of your website don’t need as much content as your blog articles, since they won’t be addressing specific questions and instead will serve as anchor points for your brand. Still, every page of your site needs to have a certain “minimum” amount of content, or else it will be perceived as “thin.”

There’s no clear formula, or single answer for the minimum amount of content a page should have. Some sources suggest having at least 600-700 words of content on every page, which will allow you to include multiple variations of your target keywords and provide a decent amount of information to your readers on almost any subject. However, it won’t take you long to find a top-ranked page that features as little as 300 words.

As you’ll soon see, while content length is correlated with higher rankings, there’s actually another variable that has a stronger influence on rankings. However, for now, understand that at least 300 words is a good minimum to shoot for.

Blog Article Research

So beyond that 300 word absolute minimum, is there a benefit to having longer content? Let’s take a look at the data.

In 2015, Moz and BuzzSumo paired up to produce a content study I still find fascinating and relevant. They collaborated to analyze the number of social shares and links earned by more than one million pieces of content available on the web. One critical insight here is the disproportional distribution of shares and links; 75 percent of content pieces receive no links or shares whatsoever, while the vast majority of links and shares is limited to a minority of content pieces.

Almost in line with this effect, more than 85 percent of written content contains fewer than 1,000 words. However, consistently, content with 1,000 words or more tends to attract significantly more links and shares.

This effect isn’t limited to 2015. A recent report by SEMRushstudying ranking factors in 2017 also found that longer pages tended to rank higher. Researchers calculated a 45 percent difference in length between search entries that appeared within the top 3 rankings, and position 20 entries.

For reference, the average content length for top 3 rankings was about 750 words, while the average content length for position 20 rankings was about 500 words. These data points were gathered by studying more than 600,000 different keywords on a global basis, relying on SEMRush’s more than 1.5 million users.

Overall, it seems that the longer your content is, the higher its chances will be to earn a high ranking—but there are some complicating factors you also need to consider.

Benefits of Short Articles

Just because shorter articles tend to rank lower doesn’t mean short articles are inherently bad. In fact, some of them have some big advantages. For starters, some users prefer to read short content over long content (either due to time restraints or attention limits). If part of your target market happens to prefer short articles (under 500 words), it may be disadvantageous for you to exclusively publish long articles, since you may alienate some readers.

Short articles also offer much more concise answers to user questions; if you’re intending to optimize for specific long-tail keyword phrases, or if you’re trying to get your content featured as a rich answer, it may be better to have a short, concise entry.

Length vs. Density

It’s worth noting at this point that what may matter most isn’t necessarily the length of the content itself, but rather the amount of information available within that content – its density.

It just so happens that longer content naturally tends to include more facts (when it’s well-written) and information. For example, a 300-word, densely written article may have more valuable information in it than a 1,500-word fluff piece.

For that reason, I can’t simply encourage you to write longer pieces of content; the equation isn’t that simple.

The Bottom Line

Obviously, length is just one of many factors that could contribute to your on-page content’s eventual success. Still, it’s an important quality to consider. So what’s the right approach here?

Overall, longer content tends to perform better than shorter content, with pages having 1000 words or more performing best. However, shorter pieces of content (3-500 words) can also perform well, provided they’re densely and intelligently written.

It’s therefore wise to have a diverse mix of different content lengths available to your readers, with a slight skew to longer content, and always a commitment to publishing the best material you can.

Content is king when it comes to SEO. You can’t have an SEO campaign without content; it’s the fuel that makes SEO work.

You’ve heard this all before, but it’s less often that you hear about the specific, objective qualities that make content effective. Millions of businesses and individuals are competing for visibility in search engines, and many of them are writing what is, subjectively, “good” content. But what makes that content “good”?

You can point to the writing style, the target audience, the practicality, and various other subjective factors, but today I want to focus on one specific, objective factor; is the length of your content a predictor of its SEO performance? And if so, what’s the ideal length of content to earn a high ranking in organic search results?

Page Content Minimums

Obviously, different types of content should be considered differently; for example, the core pages of your website don’t need as much content as your blog articles, since they won’t be addressing specific questions and instead will serve as anchor points for your brand. Still, every page of your site needs to have a certain “minimum” amount of content, or else it will be perceived as “thin.”

There’s no clear formula, or single answer for the minimum amount of content a page should have. Some sources suggest having at least 600-700 words of content on every page, which will allow you to include multiple variations of your target keywords and provide a decent amount of information to your readers on almost any subject. However, it won’t take you long to find a top-ranked page that features as little as 300 words.

As you’ll soon see, while content length is correlated with higher rankings, there’s actually another variable that has a stronger influence on rankings. However, for now, understand that at least 300 words is a good minimum to shoot for.

Blog Article Research

So beyond that 300 word absolute minimum, is there a benefit to having longer content? Let’s take a look at the data.

In 2015, Moz and BuzzSumo paired up to produce a content study I still find fascinating and relevant. They collaborated to analyze the number of social shares and links earned by more than one million pieces of content available on the web. One critical insight here is the disproportional distribution of shares and links; 75 percent of content pieces receive no links or shares whatsoever, while the vast majority of links and shares is limited to a minority of content pieces.

Almost in line with this effect, more than 85 percent of written content contains fewer than 1,000 words. However, consistently, content with 1,000 words or more tends to attract significantly more links and shares.

This effect isn’t limited to 2015. A recent report by SEMRushstudying ranking factors in 2017 also found that longer pages tended to rank higher. Researchers calculated a 45 percent difference in length between search entries that appeared within the top 3 rankings, and position 20 entries.

For reference, the average content length for top 3 rankings was about 750 words, while the average content length for position 20 rankings was about 500 words. These data points were gathered by studying more than 600,000 different keywords on a global basis, relying on SEMRush’s more than 1.5 million users.

Overall, it seems that the longer your content is, the higher its chances will be to earn a high ranking—but there are some complicating factors you also need to consider.

Benefits of Short Articles

Just because shorter articles tend to rank lower doesn’t mean short articles are inherently bad. In fact, some of them have some big advantages. For starters, some users prefer to read short content over long content (either due to time restraints or attention limits). If part of your target market happens to prefer short articles (under 500 words), it may be disadvantageous for you to exclusively publish long articles, since you may alienate some readers.

Short articles also offer much more concise answers to user questions; if you’re intending to optimize for specific long-tail keyword phrases, or if you’re trying to get your content featured as a rich answer, it may be better to have a short, concise entry.

Length vs. Density

It’s worth noting at this point that what may matter most isn’t necessarily the length of the content itself, but rather the amount of information available within that content – its density.

It just so happens that longer content naturally tends to include more facts (when it’s well-written) and information. For example, a 300-word, densely written article may have more valuable information in it than a 1,500-word fluff piece.

For that reason, I can’t simply encourage you to write longer pieces of content; the equation isn’t that simple.

The Bottom Line

Obviously, length is just one of many factors that could contribute to your on-page content’s eventual success. Still, it’s an important quality to consider. So what’s the right approach here?

Overall, longer content tends to perform better than shorter content, with pages having 1000 words or more performing best. However, shorter pieces of content (3-500 words) can also perform well, provided they’re densely and intelligently written.

It’s therefore wise to have a diverse mix of different content lengths available to your readers, with a slight skew to longer content, and always a commitment to publishing the best material you can.

Source: How Long Should Your Content Be For Optimal SEO?

26- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
132 Views

3 Reasons Why Landing Pages Are Important for a PPC Campaign

What is a landing page? A landing page at its most basic is any web page that a person can visit or “land” on when navigating the internet. They are stand-alone pages, distinct from your main website, that are developed for the purpose of advertising, and with a goal to generate conversions and leads.

Since landing pages are designed separately from the main site, there are usually no options to navigate, forcing users to focus on the copy or message that is tailored to the conversion goal of the page. Featured images, use of color, calls-to-action, and a lead generation form are all essential parts of a landing page that help to increase conversions.

For the purposes of this post, we will focus on the relationship between landing pages and pay-per-click (PPC) campaigns; however, the following best practices can be applied to all traffic sources.

1. Landing pages improve paid search campaigns

If you have ever advertised on Google AdWords, you’ll be familiar with its grading system known as Quality Score. Your Quality Score is determined by the following factors:

  • Your ad click-through rate (CTR)
  • The relevance of each keyword to its ad group
  • Landing page quality and relevance
  • The relevance of your ad text

The quality of your landing page is an important factor that contributes to your Quality Score, and the better your Quality Score, the lower your cost-per-click will be—resulting in you getting more value from the campaign.

RELATED: Designing Effective PPC Landing Pages for Mobile Devices: Advice From Real Experts

Google wants to show ads to its users that are most likely to solve their problems so they can take action. A landing page serves this purpose as it does not have excess navigation links and includes messages on the page that are specifically designed for advertising campaigns. The information, therefore, is very relevant, meaning there is a high likelihood that users will fill out call-to-action forms or call your office.

2. Landing pages increase conversions

Businesses that advertise through search engines are more focused on increasing their sales versus trying to increase brand awareness. As a result, their PPC traffic is psychologically different from their organic traffic and needs to be marketed to differently. A user who visits a landing page will either immediately take action by filling out a form, or will simply just leave the page, so the window of opportunity to convert PPC traffic is small. However, since limited information is presented on a landing page, visitors are not overloaded with extraneous information, and if they are the right audience, they will be more likely to take action.

Landing pages are set up separate from main websites, and with the help of online tools like LeadpagesUnbounce, or Instapage, advertisers can do split tests (also known as A/B tests) of the copy, calls-to-action, and other features to test and improve conversions without affecting the main site.

3. Landing pages generate data and insights

To find out whether Google AdWords is right for you or if you should advertise somewhere else (on Facebook, for example), a landing page can help identify the most efficient channel for generating leads. The insights generated by a landing page can also help to identify the right message or call-to-action that will increase conversions, which can then be used to increase user experience, resulting in a lower cost per lead.

Should you ask for users’ phone numbers on a landing page, or just names and emails? You can do split testing on your landing page to find out if adding a field for a phone number increases conversions.

In conclusion, landing pages are an invaluable part of a PPC campaign and will not only help improve ad performance, but will directly contribute to the bottom line of your business.

Source: 3 Reasons Why Landing Pages Are Important for a PPC Campaign | AllBusiness.com

10- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
118 Views

3 Masterful SEO Insights That Will Change Your Life

3 Masterful SEO Insights That Will Change Your Life

Some SEO insights offer incremental improvement. Others can change your life forever.

We need both. But today I want to focus on three life-changing insights.

As you can probably guess, these aren’t “tactics.” These are fundamental ways of looking at your discipline. You may even have heard some of them before. But if there’s one thing I’ve learned in life, it’s that knowing is different from doing.

These are three key insights that master SEOs put in practice in their daily lives.

1. The Hustle Matters Twice As Much As The Algorithm

Understanding as much as is possible about the search engine algorithms is crucial in order to be an effective SEO.

In fact, I believe that the search industry as a whole is severely underinformed. Many SEO professionals (and agencies):

  • Jump to conclusions far too swiftly from correlative studies.
  • Take universal lessons from anecdotes too often.
  • Ignore Google’s guidelines too frequently.
  • Take industry-wide “best practice” too seriously and their own data not seriously enough.

As an industry, we need to be better skeptics, experimenters, and testers.

I’m not at all dismissing the technical side of SEO when I say that the hustle is twice as important as the algorithm.

The search engine is designed to make ranking difficult. It is built on the foundational assumption that the most cited pages are the most valuable.

You have to get noticed.

Getting noticed takes work.

If you don’t put yourself out there, your SEO strategy is doomed to failure.

I can pretty much guarantee some readers are scoffing right now. “This is supposed to be a life-changing revelation that will change my life? Get real. I already know this.”

For some of you, that may be the case. But for most of you, I think the following is much more likely: you know this is what you’re supposed to do, you’ve heard of it before, but somehow it hasn’t quite sunk in. Somehow, something is holding you back, and you’re refusing to invest in the hustle.

I know because I’ve been there.

We’ve all been there.

We get stuck in that phase of information addiction. If that’s where you are, I know what it feels like.

Deep down, you know you should be putting more of what you’ve learned to action. You know you should test that tactic you learned last Friday. You know you should build a process to ensure that all of this gets done.

But you can’t help it.

Some nagging part of you says “Just this next tactic. Just this next blog post. And then I’ll know enough to really put all of this to action.”

I’m here to tell you no, you need to hit the ground running and make it happen.

And I’m not talking about trying that one tactic one time and forgetting about it.

I’m talking about having the resolve and dedication to make it an institutionalized habit.

  • Put tactics to full use.
  • Make it a part of your routine.
  • Measure the results.
  • Adjust as needed.

This is the only way to cross the bridge from theory to practice. And I guarantee when you start making a habit out of crossing that bridge, you’re going to realize just how much of the theory you come across is a waste of time.

No reserve of knowledge is more powerful than your own history of attempts and failures.

SEO knowledge isn’t power. It’s only potential.

2. If You Don’t Build It, They Won’t Come

I’m going to let you in on a little secret.

The winners of the internet don’t “produce content.” They build things.

(Easy there. We’re marketers. You’re reading content right now. We understand the value. Hear us out.)

Are you old enough to remember when the internet first started taking off? Do you remember that hot new phrase: “interactivity?”

Ask yourself, what do you spend most of your time on the internet doing?

Are you consuming the internet, or are you using it?

If you’re like most people, you spend a pretty solid portion of your time online.

More importantly, of the time you spend using the internet, you probably use a pretty small number of sites. Know why? Because most sites are built to be consumed instead of used. Most sites take lessons from their peers at the bottom, rather than the industry leaders at the top.

Just take a look at the most linked sites on the internet.

I see an awful lot of tools and platforms here. Not so many “content producers.”

Again, this isn’t intended as some kind of anti-content marketing rallying cry. Instead, I’d like you to now think about your favorite content site.

Do you use it, or consume it?

What first put them on your radar? Did you land on a random blog post, or did you come across a massive content resource of some kind that you quickly realized you almost couldn’t live without?

Look at any developed online industry and you will find that the top players have at least one page on their site that is elevated to this level.

What I mean is this: the page crosses a threshold. It ceases to be “content” and it becomes a free product. It’s something so valuable that people actually come to use it, not just to consume it. And they will likely use it more than once or twice.

These pages aren’t always the highest converting, but they are usually the most heavily linked, second only to the homepage, and they are usually the most heavily trafficked, with the highest return rate. All of these things play a crucial role in rankings, brand reputation, and brand recognition.

If you have to choose between “producing content” and “building something,” go with the latter. A tool, a platform, a community, or an “ultimate guide” is almost always going to draw more traffic and links than your next piece of “content.”

I strongly believe that you need to produce content and build something. You need both. Most only have one.

The internet was built to be used.

3. If It’s Not For Anything Else, It’s Not For SEO Either

A masterful SEO understands the search engines and understands that they can’t rely on the search engines.

Let me explain.

First and foremost, there are two simple facts:

  • The algorithm changes, and it changes constantly.
  • Google warns us against manipulating the algorithm.

I want to hammer these points home, because they are often either ignored or acknowledged and then quickly treated as though the statements were never uttered.

First, the algorithm (algorithms, really) is updated about 500 times every year.

Just let that sink in. It is updated once or twice every single day.

Google’s search engine is just a massive collection of interfacing code. It is interacting with a constantly crawled and updated search index. No single engineer at Google can possibly understand fully how their own search engine works.

We’re talking about a massive collection of protocols, applications, operating systems, databases, and information retrieval processes. If you’ve ever dealt with complex code, then you know how much one small tweak can change everything else inadvertently. And I’m talking about the kinds of changes that don’t show up as “syntax error.”

So if you’ve been studying all of those “ranking factors” hoping to “reverse engineer” the algorithm, you have presented yourself with a task that is quite literally impossible. We can only hope to find statistical tendencies, and you absolutely must treat every site and every SERP as its own entity with different sorts of factors taking priority.

Second, I can’t stress enough how important this point is from Google’s guidelines:

“Avoid tricks intended to improve search engine rankings. A good rule of thumb is whether you’d feel comfortable explaining what you’ve done to a website that competes with you, or to a Google employee. Another useful test is to ask, ‘Does this help my users? Would I do this if search engines didn’t exist?’”

Don’t get me wrong. The idea that you should only do things that you would feel comfortable sharing with a competitor is laughable, and pretending search engines don’t exist today is even more impossible than it was when the guidelines were first written.

But the implications are clear. If your SEO tactics are only helpful for SEO, and do nothing else for you, you’re on uneasy ground with Google’s guidelines.

Final Thoughts

Anybody who has been doing SEO for a long time know that those “pure” algorithmic SEO tactics fade with age.

Only SEO rooted solid marketing principles continue to work for you in long term.

A masterful SEO always has two eyes open: one on the search engine, the other on marketing.

Remember, the SEO mindset is one of cumulative growth.

We are looking for lasting improvements. Each incremental improvement is intended to tack more visits, more links, and more revenue to our long-term monthly figures, not just to this month’s figures.

That means not just using tactics and strategies that the search engines will always be OK with, but using tactics and strategies that don’t strictly rely on search engines to have lasting, cumulative impacts.

Put these insights to use. You won’t regret it.

Source: 3 Masterful SEO Insights That Will Change Your Life

10- Jul2017
Posted By: DPadmin
158 Views

SEO Vs. PPC: Pros, Cons And A Holistic Approach To Search

Attorneys are bombarded with information about digital marketing. To break through all of the information online, lawyers know having a strong digital presence is essential if they want to remain competitive.

Paid and organic search are two popular methods of online marketing with two distinctly different approaches. According to a 2016 survey, 53% of consumers use search to find a local business at least one time per month, indicating that attorneys need to have either an organic or pay-to-play strategy or some combination of the two.

Even seasoned internet marketers debate the benefits of paid search over organic search engine optimization campaigns for marketing a law firm online. Both have pros and cons, both require some investment, and both can be incredibly complicated.

There’s A Tool For Every Job

Before we go any further, we can’t say SEO is better than pay-per-click advertising or vice versa. Not every job requires a hammer, and each technique has its place in online marketing. More often than not, these two channels work in a holistic fashion to drive traffic to a website. As is true with investing, lawyers should not place all their eggs in one basket. A thoughtful, comprehensive approach is better than a laser-beam focus on one channel.

For firms that find themselves in the position of having to choose between SEO and PPC, here is the reality.

PPC: Fast, Targeted And Precise Traffic

Over the past decade, PPC has become a popular way for law firms to get direct exposure to the hordes of people using Google or social platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

Mainstream ad platforms make it easy for marketers to target the exact audiences they want (and not the ones they don’t care about). Despite the sometimes prohibitive costs of paid search, attorneys can use it successfully to generate quality leads for their firms. A huge plus for pay-per-click is the immediate nature of it. As soon as campaigns are approved, they can start generating traffic and leads. No other form of digital marketing has that kind of impact except email marketing (which assumes you have a large list to communicate with).

Here are some other pros and cons for PPC:

  • The cost per click (CPC) can be very high for legal terms (in some cases, close to $100 per click for competitive niches). However, top positions in search can then be bought, and not all legal terms are that expensive.
  • First-page search traffic can be obtained almost instantly; however, as soon as the ad budget runs out or ads are discontinued, the traffic disappears.
  • Ads can be shown to the specific audience a lawyer wants to reach, helping him or her land the cases he or she wants. However, ad platforms can be complicated and difficult to learn.
  • Although PPC for attorneys can be expensive, some data show that 84% of visitors convert on their first trip a site.

SEO: Long-Lasting Investment In Your Web Presence

Search engine optimization has been catching the eye of law firms that realize the growing need to have visibility on the internet and in search. Google has a dominant market share in the world of search, so it’s no surprise law firms fixate on it. Even though SEO can take a long time to show results (in many cases, four to six months), the dividends it pays last long into the future.

Even after SEO work has stopped, law firms can continue to rank well for their keyword terms for weeks or even months for less competitive keywords. A high-quality SEO campaign is focused not only on search but also an attorney’s entire web presence.  Things like generating good content, building citations out across the internet, and generating a presence on other websites for link building all help build authority for a law firm. In this way, SEO becomes a more thorough marketing initiative instead of a one-off campaign.

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Here are some additional pros and cons of SEO:

  • SEO can give firms a solid footing in organic search but rankings can be lost to aggressive competition and algorithm changes.
  • Good SEO can help firms rank in applications like Google Maps, which is used by millions of mobile users. However, there are paid positions for those applications too.
  • Optimizing a site for search generates free traffic, but there are costs associated with hiring an SEO agency or spending a lot of your own time doing the work.

Above all else, lawyers should talk to a professional when they weigh their options between paid and organic search. Just like there are a lot of fly-by-night vendors for SEO, there are many for PPC management too. The channel you choose should align with your firm’s near- and long-term goals. It should fit into your budget and those dollars should go where they will get the best possible return on your investment.

Source: SEO Vs. PPC: Pros, Cons And A Holistic Approach To Search